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Reader comments 6.6.12

A country divided

Dear Editor:

To paraphrase a great author Tom Paine, these are truly times that will try men’s souls. Our economy is struggling and fear grips not only America but especially Europe. In many ways our financial future is out of our control. What we do have control over is that our representatives in Washington include too many sunshine patriots who claim to be job creators, but will not pass any bill that will hire Americans to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure.

And why won’t they pass any real jobs bill? Because they are more interested in partisan gain than in helping to rebuild America. This attitude is unpatriotic. Our representatives in Washington should have the national interests at heart and they should not put the interests of their political party ahead of what we, the people, need.

We are a country divided. Our middle class is under fire and shrinking. Our Republic can not stand if partisanship reigns while the division between the very wealthy and powerful grow and the ranks of the ever increasing poor continue to increase.

The super wealthy and the powerful on Wall Street are our new aristocracy, no less dangerous to liberty than the monarchy we fought against in our revolution.

The far right would have you believe that law and regulations that seek to manage greed endanger liberty, but quite the contrary. Laws and regulations are there to protect capitalism against the scourge of greed.

It is time for a second Bill of Rights that will guarantee American security. Americans have the right to a livable wage. Americans should demand the freedom from unfair competition and monopolies. There is nothing fair about corporate welfare for oil companies. The price per barrel has gone down dramatically but the price at the pump has remained high. Americans have a right to a good education and they have the right to have medical care. Medical care is not broccoli.

This election in the fall will tell a lot about America. Choose wisely!!

Gar Byrum

Claremont

 

A healthy community

Dear Editor:

The school board deserves our gratitude for responding to the clear sentiment of the community and rescinding the dismissal of Frank D’Emilio.

It is not easy for a governing body to reverse a decision. Elected officials generally believe they have sound judgment. When the public disagrees, government officials often dig in their heels and succumb to a defensive siege mentality.

Our school board members demonstrated the willingness to listen to their constituents and the ability to reconsider a difficult decision. That is how we like to think Claremont can work.

Our community, which the school board represents, ultimately functioned as a healthy complex organism that had inadvertently ingested a toxic substance. The symptoms were painful and frightening. The toxic substance had to be eliminated. That process was unpleasant, but everyone feels better now.  We just have to watch what we eat.

Claremont Unified School District continues to promote lifelong learning.

Dave Nemer

Claremont

 

Disappointed

Dear Editor:

After all of the articles about Frank D’Emilio’s character and the Claremont Unified School District’s handling of issues surrounding it, we were able to read 2 voices of reason reported by Sarah Torribio: those of Judy Kingsley and Victoria Shea.

It appears that the district, in seeking to be fair and reasonable with Mr. D’Emilio, forgot issues of his complete absence of thoughtful, ethical behavior and lack of good judgment.

The parents of Claremont should be able to expect that anyone serving their children exhibit an honest and worthy example. It is clear that Mr. D’Emilio’s acts of deception in dealing with all seekers of truth, coupled with his complete disregard with the mandate of reporting suspected child abuse, is sufficient to prevent his ability to serve our children in future. 

That some in the community were able to whip up support for questionable behavior by use of social media is not in keeping with what most adults expect in those who work closely with children. 

Some of us were disappointed that he was allowed to remain in any position in Claremont Unified School District.

Linda Callaway

Claremont

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