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CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE: Amended sign program for Chase Bank in the Sprouts Center

The Architectural Commission approved an amendment to the sign restrictions for the new Chase Bank building at the northwest corner of Foothill Boulevard and Mountain Avenue. The amendment will allow for larger building-mounted signs and 2 freestanding signs at the future bank location.

The first freestanding sign, to be located on the corner, is 6 feet tall and will list only Chase Bank and Sprouts Market. The second freestanding sign, just west of the main entrance to the Sprouts Center, will be 13 feet tall and list 8 tenants of the center, including Chase Bank and Sprouts Market.

Both monument signs will have colors and materials that match the existing Sprouts and approved Chase buildings.    

 

Renovation and expansion of Pitzer College President’s House

The Architectural Commission has approved a major renovation and expansion of the Pitzer College President’s residence at 739 N. Harvard Ave.

The historic front portion of the home will be preserved, while a large addition to the rear and south end of the original home will be demolished and reconstructed.

The new addition will be designed to better blend with the original portion of the home, and several safety and access related deficiencies will be corrected. The home has served as the college president’s house for nearly 40 years.   

 

Political sign guidelines for residents

As the Tuesday, June 5 California primary election nears, residents may expect a number of candidates and supporters to display campaign signs in the coming weeks.

Residents and property owners are welcome to display such signs on private property. Signs may not be placed on public property such as utility poles, traffic signal poles or in public parks. Signs may not be posted within public rights of way, such as parkways and medians.

Though there are no restrictions on the number of signs permitted per premise, sign sizes are limited to no more than 16 square feet and freestanding signs cannot be more than 6 feet in height.

Residents can review the Claremont Municipal Code Section 18.015.030.F, “governing temporary political signs,” in its entirety at www.ci.claremont.ca.us  or contact Community Improvement at 399-5467 with further questions.

 

Carbon monoxide detectors now required in homes

The city of Claremont’s Building Division reminds residents that all homes in California are now required to be equipped with a carbon monoxide detector. Carbon Monoxide (CO) is known as the “silent killer,” because it is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas that can catch its victims completely unaware. CO detectors can be found at hardware stores for around $20.

 

Video detection installation at key intersections assists cyclists

Video detection has been installed at signalized intersections to “improve traffic flow and to allow for the detection of bicyclists.” The intersections of Indian Hill at Eighth and Tenth Streets; Bonita at Cambridge and Mountain; Claremont Boulevard and First Street; and Base Line at Towne Avenue now have video detection. 

The old push buttons at Indian  Hill and Eighth and Tenth Street are no longer necessary for bicyclists to cross Indian Hill Boulevard.

 

Padua Hills Theatre accepting applications for nonprofit, community events

The Padua Hills Theatre Community Use Program reserves dates each year for nonprofit organizations interested in hosting community events at substantially reduced rates. The program offers a unique opportunity for nonprofits to host events in the historic setting. 

The Padua Hills Theatre Community Use Committee is now accepting applications for events that will take place between January 1 and December 31, 2013. Applications are subject to the review and approval of the committee. Agencies that are awarded a community-use date will receive an event rental package valued at over $5550.

There are currently 9 community use dates available throughout the year to accommodate both weekend and weekday events. All applications must be submitted to the Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., by Thursday, June 7, at 5 p.m. for priority consideration. Otherwise, applications will be considered on a first-come-first serve basis. 

Nonprofits interested in submitting an application may download an event planning form and community use addendum on the city website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us. 

An optional meeting will be conducted at the Padua Hills Theatre on Tuesday, May 22 at 10 a.m. allowing applicants to tour the site and answer any questions. RSVP to Lauren Marshall if you plan to attend. Photos of the facility can also be viewed at the Chantrelles Catering website at www.chantrellescatering.com.

For more information on the community use program, contact Ms. Marshall at 399-5356 or lmarshall@ ci.claremont.ca.us.   

 

CGU professors head to Washington, DC

Claremont Graduate University professors Tom Horan and Brian Hilton have been invited to Washington DC next week by the U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park for a brainstorming session on how technology and data can be used for public safety purposes. Mr. Horan and Mr. Hilton are part of the School of Information Systems and Technology (SISAT) at CGU.

Mr. Hilton and Mr. Horan employ their backgrounds in economics and information technology to create extremely detailed digital maps that contain multiple layers of information, are used in natural distaters, Mr. Hilton’s maps were helpful in Haiti, Japan and West Africa, assisting leaders with development and disaster relief through GIS (geographic information systems) software.

Mr. Horan’s key map-project is his work as a principle developer of SafeRoadMaps, a website that uses traffic safety date to analyze dangerous roads and highways. The website states that although “there is widespread use of visual, geospatial and consumer-based systems for traffic congestion and navigation,” this does not carry over into systems of traffic safety. SafeRoadMaps aims to collect data to ultimately influence road safety.

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