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CALENDAR: free concert, walking tour, bird walk

Friday, February 3

FREE NOONISH CONCERT Scripps College’s Friday “Noon” Concert Series continues at 12:15 p.m. with a free performance at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., with guest artist Dr. Gustavo Lovato (Musical director, Casa de la Música, Quito, Ecuador) on flute; Rachel V. Huang (Scripps faculty), violin; and Tatiana Thibodeaux (Scripps staff accompanist) on piano. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

RENEWABLE, SUSTAINABLE ENERGY ON THE DOCKET The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College hosts a free lunch and lecture at 11:45 a.m., “From Jobs to Joules: The Current and Future State of Energy” with guest speaker R.F. “Bob” Hemphill. Mr. Hemphill, the keynote speaker for CMC’s third annual Green Careers Conference, will speak about renewable energy and a sustainable future, challenges and opportunities to renewable energy job growth and global entrepreneurship in this critical space. A global energy entrepreneur, Mr. Hemphill was a co-founder in 1981 of AES Corporate, a global electric power generating and distribution company. Mr. Hemphill was also a founder and served as CEO of AES Solar Power Ltd from its inception until his retirement in December 2013. AES Solar is a leading developer, owner and operator of utility-scale photovoltaic solar plants connected to the electric power grid. These installations, ranging in size from less than two megawatts to more than 250, consist of large arrays of land-based solar photovoltaic panels that directly convert sunlight to electricity. Under his leadership, the company designed, permitted and constructed 51 solar plants in seven countries (Spain, France, Italy, Bulgaria, Greece, India and the US) and holds a portfolio of $2.5 billion.  Since leaving AES Solar, Mr. Hemphill has published two books focused on his energy, international, and business experience: Dust Tea, Dingoes and Dragons and Stories from the Middle Seat. He is a columnist for Huffington Post, and advises several small renewable energy companies. Mr. Hemphill is the keynote speaker for CMC’s Green Careers Conference sponsored by the Roberts Environmental Center. Lunch begins at 11:45 a.m., and speaker presentations start at 12:15 p.m. Reservations are required for meals. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, by calling (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

25TH ELECTRO ACOUSTIC FEST KICKS OFF Day one of the Ussachevsky Memorial Festival of Electro Acoustic Music kicks off at 8 p.m. at Lyman Hall in the Thatcher Music Building at Pomona College, 340 N. College Ave. The 25th annual festival, which is free and open to the public, opens with contemporary music ensemble Brightwork Newmusic, whose members include Tereza Stanislav, violin; Maggie Parkins, cello; Sara Andon, flute; Phil O’Connor, clarinet; Nick Terry, percussion and Aron Kallay, piano. The group will perform music by Bill Alves, Tom Flaherty, Kaija Saariaho and others. The festival is named after Vladimir Ussachevsky (1911-1990), a 1935 Pomona College graduate, a pioneer in the field of electronic music and co-founder of the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center in New York. Mr. Ussachevsky left a bequest to the college to support activities in the field of electronic music, which has funded much of this series. More info is at pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671.

 

Saturday, February 4

CLAREMONT WALKING TOUR Claremont Heritage representatives will lead a guided walking tour of Claremont Village from 10 a.m. to noon. The cost is $5 per person. Participants should meet up prior to 10 a.m. at the Claremont Depot, located at 200 W. First St. Reservations are preferred. More information is available at claremontheritage.org, (909) 621-0848 or via email at info@claremontheritage.org.

CONTAINER GARDENING TIPS Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden hosts “Container Gardening With California Native Plants” from 10 to 11 a.m. at its Claremont location, 1500 N. College Ave. The workshop is free with regular admission and takes place at the Garden’s Grow Native Nursery. Information is at rsabg.org or (909) 625-8767.

MEDICARE STEP-BY-STEP Inter Valley Health Plan is hosting a free workshop at 10 a.m. entitled “Medicare Step By Step” at its Claremont location, 1601 Monte Vista Ave., Suite 275. “Turning 65 years of age in the next six months or so?” a press release asked. “Know your options for Medicare coverage and how to avoid possible penalties imposed if you don’t follow the steps involved. Learn the steps to get started, what to expect and your entitled benefits.” Online RSVP at ivhp.com/step-by-step.

YOUTH ORCHESTRA OPENING CONCERT Claremont Youth Symphony Orchestra presents its season opening concert at 3:30 p.m. in Bridges Hall of Music, Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St. Conducted by Robert Sage, CYSO will present a free afternoon of music from classical, Broadway, film and video game genres, including music from the phenomenally popular mobile game Pokémon GO. Doors open at 3 p.m. with open seating and no tickets required. For information about CYSO, visit claremontyouthsymphony.org.

 

Sunday, February 5

BEGINNERS BIRD WALK Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden hosts a free beginners bird walk from 8 to 9:30 a.m. this morning. Participants should wear comfortable walking shoes and bring any bird guides or binoculars available. The event, at 1500 N. College Ave., is sponsored by Pomona Valley Audubon Society. Reservations are required via email at info@rsabg.org. More info is at rsabg.org/bird-walks or (909) 625-8767.

NATURAL BASKET WEAVING WORKSHOP Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is offering a two-day basket weaving workshop, beginning today from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The cost is $50 for the public or $40 for Garden members. The Garden is located at 1500 N. College Ave. The class continues next Sunday, February 12 at the same time. Lorene Sisquoc will instruct participants in the plant and its uses and preparation in weaving a Native American style deergrass basket. More info is at rsabg.org.

BACH IS BACK Pomona College Organist William Peterson will play the Music of J. S. Bach in a free concert at 3 p.m. at Bridges Hall of Music on the Pomona College campus, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. The Harry S. and Madge Rice Thatcher Professor has played concerts in many parts of the United States offering all-Bach recitals, including complete performances of Bach’s Dritter Theil der Clavierübung. His programs have also included concerts of French music from World War I and a Lecture-Recital “A Tribute to Aristide Cavaillé-Coll (1811-1899).” In October 2002, Mr. Peterson played the inaugural concert on the Hill Memorial Organ built by C.B. Fisk of Gloucester, MA. In 2006, he was heard on “Pipedreams” (National Public Radio) in a broadcast program that included the music of Tournemire, Duruflé, and Widor. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

FAMILY ART MAKING DAY The Claremont Museum of Art has a day of family fun planned with its monthly Free Family Day, featuring free admission and family-friendly activities. The museum, at the Claremont Depot, 200 W. First St., is open from noon to 4 p.m. The event features ARTStation, a place for children to experience art and engage with local culture. High school students in CMA’s Project ARTstART will lead visitors in an art activity related to the current exhibition and the work of local Claremont artists. The opening exhibition, (re)Generation: Six Decades of Claremont Artists, features selections from the museum’s permanent collection that reflect our region’s rich artistic legacy, from the influence of Millard Sheets and the artists who arrived in the 1940s, to the GIs who came to study after WWII, to the many contemporary artists who continue to call Claremont home. The exhibition is sponsored by Gould Asset Management LLC and will be on view through March 19. The first Sunday of every month is Free Family Day at the museum. More information is at claremontmuseum.org.

CLASSICAL PIANO CONCERT Harvey Mudd College’sConcert Series presents Tatiana Thibodeaux on piano at 8 p.m. in a free show at Drinkward Recital Hall, 320 E. Foothill Blvd. Award-winning musician Ms. Thibodeaux will perform “Transcendence Visible,” featuring works by Prokofiev, Stravinsky, Ades and La Barre. Her active performance career includes solo concerts and collaborative work with  the St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra and the Chiba Symphony Orchestra, Japan. For information go to hmc.edu/calendar or call (909) 621-8022.

 

Monday, February 6

CYBERSECURITY TALK The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College hosts a free lunch and lecture at 11:45 a.m., “Smart Cities, Dumb Opportunities: How the Internet of Things and Smart Cities Are Transforming Our Lives” with 1987 Claremont McKenna graduate Darin Andersen. As the kickoff speaker for CMC’s Entrepreneurship Week, Mr. Andersen returns to his alma mater to discuss the complex, dynamic and consequential realties of cybersecurity. Lunch begins at 11:45 a.m., and speaker presentations start at 12:15 p.m. Reservations are required for meals. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

POLICING THE US The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College hosts a free dinner and lecture at 5:30 p.m. tonight, “Enforcing Laws, Maintaining Order: Policing in the US” with Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr. A professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University, Mr. Outlaw’s teaching and scholarship include social and political philosophy with particular interest in African-American philosophy and race in socio-political life. He is a professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University, where he has also served as director of the African American Studies Program (2000-2003) and associate provost for undergraduate education (2003-2011). Evening programs typically begin with a reception at 5:30 pm. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. and the talk begins at 6:45 p.m. Reservations are required for meals. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

 

 

Tuesday, February 7

TALK DNA TO ME Pomona College hosts a free lecture from 11 a.m. to noon, part of the 55th Robbins Lecture Series, “Use of Unnatural Amino Acids to Unravel a 35 A Oxidation to Make DNA Building Blocks.” The talk, at Seaver North Auditorium, 645 N. College Ave., features 2008 National Medal of Science recipient JoAnne Stubbe. The event is presented by the Pomona College chemistry department. More information is available at pomona.edu or (909) 621-8448.

QUEER ACTIVISM AND EUROPE’S REFUGEE CRISIS Claremont’s Scripps College presents a free lecture today, “The European Refugee Crisis: Neoliberal Racial Capitalism and Queer Activism,” with Fatima El-Tayeb. The talk at Vita Nova Lecture Hall, 385 E. Ninth St., starts at 12:15 p.m. and concludes at 1:15. The crisis—often referenced less as the plight of millions trying to leave military and economic warzones than the inconvenience their arrival is causing the European Union—is dominating debates across the continent. Ms. El-Tayeb’s analysis employs a queer diasporic perspective, centering Europe as a postcolonial space. This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please feel free to bring your own lunch. If you wish to purchase a lunch, nearby Malott Commons Dining Hall opens at 11:15 am.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS AND DINNER TOO The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College hosts a free dinner and lecture at 5:30 p.m. tonight, “From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads And Men,” with Tyrone B. Hayes. Mr. Hayes’ research interests lie in the impact of chemical contaminants on environmental health and public health. In this lecture, he will examine the impact of endocrine disrupting environmental contaminants on environmental and public health. Evening programs typically begin with a reception at 5:30 pm. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. and the talk begins at 6:45 p.m. Reservations are required for meals. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

FUTURIST, INVENTOR TO SPEAK Claremont’s Pomona College hosts “An Evening with Ray Kurzweil,” at 8 p.m. at Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way. Mr. Kurzweil, one of the world’s leading inventors, thinkers and futurists, with a 30-year track record of accurate predictions, will offer his insights at this free, open to the public lecture. This event is sponsored by Pomona College Information Technology Services and co-sponsored by the Claremont Colleges Library, the Rick and Susan Sontag Center for Collaborative Creativity (the Hive), the Pomona College Computer Science Department and the Pomona College Media Studies Department. Information is available at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

 

Wednesday, February 8

THE GARDEN’S SECRETS Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is offering a fun talk from 1 to 2:30 p.m., “Secrets in a Botanic Garden’s Collections, Printed and Pressed,” which includes a tour of the Garden’s library, archives and herbarium led by library specialists Irene Holiman and historian and Claremont Graduate University history professor Janet Farrell Brodie, PhD. The event, at 1500 N. College Ave., is free for students with ID and Claremont College faculty and staff, $15 for the public and $10 for Garden members. More info is at rsabg.org.

DISMANTLING AFRICAN TERROR NETWORKS The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College hosts another free dinner and lecture at 5:30 p.m., “Dismantling Terrorist Networks and Countering Violent Extremism in sub-Saharan Africa,” with guest speaker Adotei Akwei. Mr. Akwei is managing director of government relations for Amnesty, where he has focused on human rights and US foreign policy toward Africa since 1988, with occasional forays at other NGOs. Evening programs typically begin with a reception at 5:30 pm. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. and the talk begins at 6:45 p.m. Reservations are required for meals. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

GARDEN CLUB Claremont Garden Club’s monthly free and open to the public meeting focuses on “The New World of Daylilies” from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. “Mitch Holcomb bred his first daylily over 30 years ago and was hooked!” a press release stated. “Spending half the year in Claremont and the other half on the farm in Virginia, he currently blooms around 2,000 new seedlings each year.” The meeting takes place at Pilgrim Place’s Napier Center at 660 Avery Rd. Exhibits and refreshments start at 6:30 p.m., Mr. Holcomb’s talk begins at 7, and a door prize will be presented at closing.

ACTIVIST, ARTIST, AUTHOR TALK Pitzer College hosts a free lecture from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. with Greg Sholette, author of Delirium and Resistance: Activist Art and the Crisis of Capitalism. Artist, writer and activist Mr. Sholette speaks at Benson Auditorium, 1050 Mills Ave., Claremont. This talk is part of Pitzer’s annual Murray Pepper and Vicki Reynolds Pepper Distinguished Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture. The event is free and open to the public. More info is at pitweb.pitzer.edu.

WOMENS’ BACK PAIN Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center hosts a free informational talk, “Your Aching Back” at 6:30 p.m. at Pomona Valley Health Center, 1601 N. Monte Vista Ave., Claremont. Physical therapist Sandy Kraemer will explain “common conditions that affect women of all ages, how they are diagnosed and treatment options to get you pain free,” a press release stated. To RSVP or for questions call (909) 865-9858, email ferc@pvhmc.org or visit pvhmc.org.

 

Thursday, February 9

ENTREPRENEURIAL DIGNITY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College hosts a free dinner and lecture at 5:30 p.m. tonight, “Live Your Life Like A Start-Up,” with Arthur Brooks. Mr. Brooks is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and a bestselling author of 11 books on topics including the role of government, fairness, economic opportunity, happiness and the morality of free enterprise. His latest book is the New York Times bestseller The Conservative Heart: How to Build a Fairer, Happier, and More Prosperous America. Evening programs begin with a reception at 5:30 p.m. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. and the talk begins at 6:45 p.m. Reservations are required for meals. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

LULA DEL RAY Scripps College hosts Lula del Ray, an adventurous event that combines a live orchestra, projections, puppets and live actors, at 7 p.m. The show is free and open to the public at Garrison Theater, 241 E. Tenth St.. The New York Times said of Lula del Ray: “If you add up the two-dimensional and the three-dimensional to create a new spatial entity, does that mean you’re in the fifth dimension? Whatever you choose to call it, such a perspective-melting world is the realm in which the enchanting Lula del Ray takes place.” The production is a choreographic feat: Puppeteers move seamlessly between projectors, shadow puppets glide across large screens, encountering the live actors who bound between, doffing a cap here, lighting a cigarette there, as music swells from the orchestra. “With original music inspired by the likes of Hank Williams and Patsy Cline, Lula del Ray is at turns moody and bittersweet, exquisite and melancholic.” Visit scrippscollege.edu/ scrippspresents or call (909) 607-8508.

INNOCENCE PROJECT, DNA TALK Harvey Mudd College’s Distinguished Speaker Series continues with “The Innocence Project: DNA and the Wrongly Convicted,” at 7 p.m.at Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Speaking will be Barry Scheck, co-founder of the Innocence Project, who is known for his landmark litigation which has set standards for forensic applications of DNA technology. Since 1988, his and Peter Neufeld’s work in this area have shaped the course of case law across the country and led to an influential study by the National Academy of Sciences on forensic DNA testing, as well as important state and federal legislation. He and Mr. Neufeld coauthored with Jim Dwyer Actual Innocence: Five Days to Execution and Other Dispatches from the Wrongly Convicted. Mr. Scheck is a commissioner on New York’s Forensic Science Review Board, a body that regulates all of the state’s crime and forensic DNA laboratories. Information is at hmc.edu/nelson or (909) 607-0943.

INDIA AND KASHMIR Scripps College’s Humanities Institute presents “Borders, Walls, Fences: Kashmir in the Shadows of Walls and Barbed Wires: Postcolonial Contestation over Lives, Lands,” from 4:15 to 6 p.m. The free panel discussion takes place at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave. Moderated by Piya Chatterjee (Scripps College), the panel—Huma Dar and Ather Zia—will discuss India’s control of the Kashmir valley as a de-facto occupation, as well as the technologies of fashioning an empire, both material and discursive, penal and sexual, spoken and unspeakable. More info is at scrippscollege.edu or (909) 621-8237.

 

Friday, February 10

SCIENCE AND YOUR SENSES Harvey Mudd College’s Hixon Forum presents an all day forum, “Science and the Senses: Bodies and Practice” from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd. Panels, workshops and events on the body and its sensory faculties include sensing, breathing, contamination, cross-species communing, walking and more. More information is at hmc.edu/hixonforum or (909) 607-8022.

FREE NOONISH CONCERT Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues at 12:15 p.m. with Susan Lamb Cook (UC Davis faculty), cello; Gayle Blankenburg (Pomona/Scripps faculty), piano; Ronnie Brosterman (Scripps faculty), choreography; Devon Frost and Anna Paz (Scripps ‘20), dancers. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

MINGLE, MUNCH Claremont senior social group Mingle & Munch presents “Mardi Gras” with a live jazz combo from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Garner House, 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd. Admission at the door is $10 (cash only), which includes appetizers and refreshments. The event is open to persons 50 and over. RSVPs are required. Call (909) 399-5488 or visit claremontrec.com for reservations or information.

 

 

Saturday, February 11

PITCH PERFECT The International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella Southwest Quarterfinal takes place at 7 p.m. at Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way. Collegiate a cappella groups from across California will perform their best set, and the top two placing groups will advance to the semifinal. All ages are welcome. Tickets are available at pomona.edu/events or by calling (909) 607-1139.

INNOVATIVE CLASSICAL CONCERT Pomona College hosts “Violin + Piano + Drums” with Genevieve Feiwen Lee and Lina Bahn, a free 8 p.m. concert at Bridges Hall of Music, aka “Little Bridges,” 150 E. Fourth St. Violinist Ms. Bahn and pianist Ms. Feiwen Lee come together for a program of music by John Adams, George Antheil and Beethoven. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.