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CALENDAR: Science and senses, KSPC record sale

Friday, February 10

SCIENCE AND YOUR SENSES Harvey Mudd College’s Hixon Forum presents an all-day event, “Science and the Senses: Bodies and Practice” from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd. “No doubt, sensory knowledge plays a role in expert practices of research,” a press release stated. “How is it, then, that information gained through the senses remains suspect? Join us as we discuss how to account for the role of sight and sound—but especially touch, taste and smell—in the practice of science.” Panels, workshops and events on the body and its sensory faculties include sensing, breathing, contamination, cross-species communing, walking and more. This conference is sponsored by the Hixon-Riggs Forum for Responsive Science and Engineering of Harvey Mudd College, The Claremont Colleges Science, Technology, and Society Program and the Rick and Susan Sontag Center for Collaborative Creativity (the Hive). More information is at hmc.edu/hixonforum or (909) 607-8022.

FREE NOONISH CONCERT Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues at 12:15 p.m. with Susan Lamb Cook (UC Davis faculty), cello; Gayle Blankenburg (Pomona/Scripps faculty), piano; Ronnie Brosterman (Scripps faculty), choreography; Devon Frost and Anna Paz (Scripps ‘20), dancers. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

MINGLE, MUNCH Claremont senior social group Mingle & Munch presents “Mardi Gras” with a live jazz combo from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at The Women’s Club of Claremont, 343 W. Twelfth St. Please note the new location due to expected rain. Admission is $10 at the door (cash only), which includes appetizers and refreshments. The event is open to persons 50 and over. RSVPs required. Call (909) 399-5488 or visit claremontrec.com for information.

??CONTRA DANCE CONTRAversial, the contra dance club of the Claremont Colleges, invites community members of all ages to attend its February dance from 8 to 11 p.m., which will feature live music by Atlantic Crossing and instruction/calling by John Little. The event takes place at Pomona College’s Edmunds Ballroom, 170 E. Sixth St. The event is free for Claremont College students; a $5 donation is suggested for all others. Free parking is available nearby at Alexander Hall. “Contra dance is an energetic, accessible and enjoyable style of social folk dance,” a press release stated. “Essentially, one may think of it as making new friends and being active, set to music.” No prior experience is needed. Attendees do not need to bring a partner. The recommended dress is a comfortable outfit and shoes without too much grip. For information, visit contraversial.weebly.com or email claremontcontra@gmail.com.

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Saturday, February 11

GERMAN GENE EXPLORATION German genealogical research will be examined at the Pomona Valley Genealogical Society’s 2 p.m. meeting at Pomona Public Library, 625 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. The PVGS will present John P. Schmal, historian, genealogist and lecturer, who will lead a discussion focusing on key elements of German geography essential to successfully locating your German origins and tracing them back many generations. “The Germans were meticulous record keepers, so the potential rewards of understanding these dynamics may be great,” a press release stated. Mr. Schmal will also discuss research techniques for locating German ancestors. Mr. Schmal has degrees in both history and geography, and is a lifetime honorary member of the Genealogical Society of Hispanic America in Southern California (SCHA-SC) and a board member of the Society of Hispanic Ancestral Research.

PITCH PERFECT The International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella Southwest Quarterfinal takes place at 7 p.m. at Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way, Claremont. At this event, collegiate a cappella groups from across California will perform their best set, and the top two placing groups will advance to the ICCA Southwest Semifinal. All ages are welcome. Tickets are available at pomona.edu/events or by calling (909) 607-1139.

INNOVATIVE CLASSICAL CONCERT Pomona College hosts “Violin + Piano + Drums” with Genevieve Feiwen Lee and Lina Bahn, a free 8 p.m. concert at Bridges Hall of Music, aka “Little Bridges,” 150 E. Fourth St. Violinist Ms. Bahn and pianist Ms. Lee will perform music by John Adams, George Antheil and Beethoven. Ms. Bahn has been described as “brilliant” and “lyrical” by The Washington Post. With a keen interest in collaborative and innovative repertoire, she was a member of the award-winning Corigliano Quartet from 1998 to 2010. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

 

Sunday, February 12

KSPC CD AND RECORD EXPO Claremont’s long-running, beloved and vital radio station that could, KSPC 88.7 FM, is hosting its 45th semi-annual CD and Record Expo. More than 30 independent vendors will be selling new and used records and CDs from all genres, as well as posters, videos and music memorabilia from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Edmunds Ballroom, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. 6th St. Admission is only $2 or free with current Claremont Colleges ID. Parking is free. For more information go to kspc.org or call (909) 621-8157, extension 1.

BREAKING THE GLASS CEILING, MUSICALLY Pianist and Pomona College piano faculty artist Ming Tsu is joined by Ken Aiso (violin) in the US premiere of Karen Tanaka’s “Ocean” and Rebecca Clarke’s “Sonata.” The 3 p.m. concert at Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., is free. The second half of this program, with music by women breaking the glass ceiling, features Amy Beach’s Piano Quintet, with Ms. Tsu and Mr. Aiso joined by Sarah Thornblade (violin), Dale Hikawa Silverman (viola) and Ben Hong (cello). More info at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

 

Monday, February 13

THE COST OF POLITICAL AMBITION The Shakespeare Club of Pomona Valley meets to explore what really motivates Macbeth: Is it indeed ambition, or just plain fear? Explore the psychology of Shakespeare’s Scottish hero with Glenn Simshaw, assistant professor of writing at Scripps College, who will present “Macbeth, a Man Beset by Fear and Paranoia” at 2 p.m. at the Joslyn Center, 660 Mountain Ave., Claremont. The meeting is free and open to the public. The play, thought to have been first performed in 1606, dramatizes the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. Mr. Simshaw directs the Writing Center at Scripps College and specializes in rhetoric, Shakespeare, early modern and dramatic literature. Light refreshments will be served. For more info call (909) 717-1109 or email lucylynch@aol.com.

AFGHANISTAN: WHERE ARE WE NOW? The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a lecture at 6:45 p.m. tonight, “America’s Long War in Afghanistan: Fifteen Years after 9/11” with Karl W. Eikenberry. Mr. Eikenberry is the Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow and director of the US-Asia Security Initiative at Stanford University’s Asia-Pacific Research Center. Prior to his arrival at Stanford, he served as the US  Ambassador to Afghanistan from 2009 until 2011, where he led the civilian surge directed by President Obama to reverse insurgent momentum and set the conditions for transition to full Afghan sovereignty. Mr. Eikenberry had a 35-year career in the US Army, retiring in April 2009 with the rank of lieutenant general. He has served in various policy and political-military positions, including deputy chairman of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium; director for strategic planning and policy for US Pacific Command at Camp Smith, Hawaii and US security coordinator and chief of the Office of Military Cooperation in Kabul, Afghanistan. Ambassador Eickenberry’s Athenaeum talk is co-sponsored by the Keck Center for International & Strategic Studies at CMC. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

 

Tuesday, February 14

LOVE IS ALL AROUND Today’s the day we demonstrate our love by purchasing sweets and flowers and spending gobs of money at overcrowded restaurants. Not to be a cynic, but why not try something unique? Instead of waiting in line and paying through the nose for a fancy dinner, well, Trader Joe’s exists and they have plenty of good options for romantic meals you might prepare at home. And how about a night of “love soul” music with Solid Ray Woods at the Press? Mr. Woods is on at 8:30 p.m. and it’s free as heck. Regardless, treat your sweetie well and love him or her up. It may not be an official holiday with a day off from work and all that good stuff, but it’s nonetheless an important day for keeping the fires burning. Do it for love.

SENIOR COMPUTER CLUB Claremont Senior Computer Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Rd. Tonight’s theme is “Fun Night,” with team competition on computer knowledge. The group discusses general information about computers, tablets and smartphones and features an opportunity for questions to its club experts. Newcomers of any age are always welcome. More information is at cscclub.org.

HAITI, POST EARTHQUAKE Scripps College’s Tuesday Noon Series continues with “The Politics of Exclusion: Narrating Post-Earthquake Haiti” from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. in the Hampton Room at Malott Commons, 345 E. Ninth St. In this free and open to the public event, Myriam J.A. Chancy—author, Guggenheim Fellow, and HBA Chair of the Humanities at Scripps College—will read from her novel-in-progress, Douze. In this presentation, via text and photography, Ms. Chancy will attempt to narrate a variety of points of view on the lived experience of the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake, which devastated central parts of Haiti. She will also discuss why the post-earthquake situation should matter to all of us and what the consistent, historical disavowal of Haiti’s place in the development of the hemisphere (in terms of the creation of national borders and philosophical boundaries) has meant in terms of the current inability of the populace to recover from natural and man-made disasters. A discussion of the role fiction can play in the breaking down fences and walls (real and metaphorical) through empathy will also be engaged. This event is presented in partnership with the Humanities Institute, Office of Public Events and Community Programs and Tuesday Noon Academy. More information is at scrippscollege.edu or (909) 621-8237.

HAITI, POST EARTHQUAKE Scripps College’s Tuesday Noon Series continues with “The Politics of Exclusion: Narrating Post-Earthquake Haiti” from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. in the Hampton Room at Malott Commons, 345 E. Ninth St. In this free and open to the public event, Myriam J.A. Chancy—author, Guggenheim Fellow, and HBA Chair of the Humanities at Scripps College—will read from her novel-in-progress, Douze. In this presentation, via text and photography, Ms. Chancy will attempt to narrate a variety of points of view on the lived experience of the January 12, 2010 earthquake, which devastated central parts of Haiti. A discussion of the role fiction can play in breaking down fences and walls (real and metaphorical) through empathy will also be engaged. This event is presented in partnership with the Humanities Institute, Office of Public Events and Community Programs and Tuesday Noon Academy. More information is at scrippscollege.edu or (909) 621-8237.

 

Wednesday, February 15

DISSENT IN A DEMOCRACY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a lecture at 12:15 p.m., “Dissent in Democracy” with Halim Dhanidina. The Honorable Judge Halim Dhanidina will address the crucial role that dissent plays in all aspects of democratic life, with a special focus on the role of the dissent in judicial decision making. Judge Dhanidina is a Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge, currently assigned to hear criminal cases in the Long Beach Superior Court. Prior to his current position he was a deputy district attorney for Los Angeles County for 14 years, prosecuting cases for the elite hardcore gang and major crimes divisions before serving in the district attorney’s special operations administration. He is a member of the board of the interfaith organization, Muslim-Jewish NewGround, sponsored by the Los Angeles City Commission on Human Relations, and he sits on the advisory board of the Asian Pacific American Bar Association, as well as the Orange County Advisory Council of Asian Americans Advancing Justice. He has been recognized for his service to the community as a recipient of the Muslim Public Affairs Council Foundation’s Community Leadership Award in 2013 and the Muslim Legal Fund of America’s Trailblazer in Justice Award in 2014, as well as the South Asian Bar Association Foundation’s 2016 Trailblazer Award. Judge Dhanidina’s Athenaeum talk is made possible in collaboration with the Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

GENETIC ANTHROPOLOGY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, at 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a lecture at 6:45 p.m., “The Human Journey: A Genetic Odyssey” with Spencer Wells. Population geneticist Mr. Wells will provide an overview of genetic anthropology, including new developments in the field, as wells as future directions in the fast growing field of consumer genomics. He has appeared in numerous documentary films and is the author of three books, The Journey of Man, Deep Ancestry, and Pandora’s Seed. Mr. Wells lives in Austin, Texas, where he is founder and CEO of consumer genomics startup Insitome, an adjunct professor at the University of Texas, and owner of the iconic blues club Antone’s. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/

open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

 

Thursday, February 16

PRESIDENTIAL INTELLIGENCE CHALLENGES The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, at 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free lecture at 6:45 p.m., “Leading Intelligence Analysis,” with retired CIA intelligence officer Fran Moore. Ms. Moore will discuss the challenges of leading analysis and producing insights to support the president and US policymakers as they formulate foreign policy and cope with national security threats; she will share lessons learned in intelligence analysis, anticipate issues likely to confront the new administration, and reflect on her experiences as a career intelligence officer. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

FOWL CURIOUS? The topic at Claremont Green Drinks International’s meeting is “Cheers for Chickens.” The group meets from 6 to 8 p.m. at Claremont Craft Ales, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., #204c. “Have you been curious about raising backyard chickens?” a press release asked. “Do you love farm fresh eggs but don’t know how to begin? If you want to learn from other people’s experiences raising hens in the city or share some of your own, please join us!” The meetings takes place monthly, with environmentally minded folks getting together over beers to chat about green-centric topics. They are free and open to the public. For more info, email greendrinks@sustainableclaremont.org or go to sustainableclaremont.org.

SONGWRITING SUMMIT, CONCERT The Cal Poly Pomona Music Department presents “Songwriters-in-the-Round” with Vicki Peterson (the Bangles), Shelly Peiken, Bleu, Mike Viola, Eleni Mandell, Kelly Jones, Keaton Simons, Mara Connor, Linus of Hollywood, Arthur Winer and MC Prototype” at 8 p.m. in Music Recital Hall, 3801 W. Temple Ave., Pomona. Tickets are $15 or $10 for students, and are available at csupomona.tix. com or (909) 869-3554. The Songwriters-in-the-Round concert will be preceded by a free songwriting summit from 2 to 5 p.m.

WARHOL CURATOR TO SPEAK The Pomona College Museum of Art hosts “Now Screening: Andy Warhol Print,” a curatorial talk with Adam Starr, from 7 to 9 p.m. The lecture at the gallery, 330 N. College Ave., is free and open to the public and will be followed by a reception. The show is the third in a series of exhibitions developed by student curators under the Janet Inskeep Benton ‘79 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) at the Pomona College Museum of Art. More information is at pomona.edu/museum or (909) 607-7543.

EUROPEAN/CUBAN RELATIONS Scripps College is the site of a free lunchtime talk, “European Union Relations with Cuba,” from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. in school’s Hampton Room, 1030 Columbia Ave. Alain Bothorel, deputy to the Ambassador, EU Delegation in La Havana, Cuba is the speaker. Mr. Bothorel studied accounting and finance, then international business in post-graduate studies and holds an MBA degree from the Monterey Institute of International Studies in California. Doors open at noon. This event is presented by European Union Center of California. More information is available at scrippscollege.edu/events.

READING IS FUNDAMENTAL Scripps College hosts National Book Foundation Executive Director Lisa Lucas from 6 to 7 p.m. for a conversation about the importance the written word. The talk at Balch Auditorium, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., is free, open to the public and is part of the college’s Roxanne Wilson Fund for Women’s Leadership. Ms. Lucas is the first female and African American to lead the National Book Foundation. She is “committed to building readership and nourishing a literary ecosystem that represents American diversity in all of its guises,” a press release stated. More information is available at scrippscollege.edu/events.

 

Friday, February 17

CLAREMONT AUTHOR TO SPEAK Claremont resident Simon Wood will speak at 10 a.m. at Pilgrim Congregational Church’s annual library coffee. The free event is open to the public and will include refreshments. After the discussion there will be an opportunity to purchase copies of Mr. Wood’s book, Deconstructing Jack: The Secret History of the Whitechapel Murders, about popular culture’s fascination with Jack the Ripper. “The book is the result of over 20 years of research and casts a skeptical eye over the continuous stream of lies, invention, misinformation, self-publicity and opportunism, which has kept this Victorian bogeyman alive in the darkest reaches of our 21st century imaginations.” The church is at 600 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. Information is available at pilgrimchurchpomona.com or (909) 622-1373.

RARE DISEASE DAY In what may be the most somber symposium title the COURIER has ever seen, Claremont’s Keck Graduate Institute will host “Rare Disease Day” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the university’s Founder’s Room, 535 Watson Dr., Claremont.This event features distinguished panelists focusing on a deadly serious subject. “Individually, rare diseases affect relatively few Americans,” a press release stated. “Collectively, they cause millions of people and their families to suffer. For many of these diseases, no treatment is available. For some, drugs or other therapies exist, but patients are unable to access them because the cost is too high. KGI’s Center for Rare Disease Therapies addresses these issues by raising awareness of rare diseases and promoting promising treatments. The center educates students to become biotech industry leaders who understand rare diseases and recognize the need for remedies.” More information is available at calendar.kgi.edu or (909) 607-0120.

FREE NOONISH CONCERT Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues at 12:15 p.m. with Ensemble L??k?ja: Traditional Baltic and Latvian folk music celebrating the Winter Solstice. Ensemble members include Paul Berkolds (Scripps faculty), vocals/accordion; Drew Corey, vocals; Ingrida Jennings, vocals/violin/kokle; Erik Jerumanis, percussion; Justin Scheid, recorder/flute/bagpipes and Katriana Zommers, vocals/guitar. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

CLIMATE SCIENCE  Pitzer College’s Benson Auditorium hosts Juliet Christian-Smith from the Union of Concerned Scientists as she delivers the annual John D. Sullivan Memorial lecture on climate change and water availability in California. The talk, from 2:15 to 3:30 p.m., is free and open to the public. Benson Auditorium is at 1050 N. Mills Ave. Dr. Christian-Smith’s discussion, “Climate Change: ‘La Madre’ of Weather Systems,” is sponsored by Pitzer College’s Robert Redford Conservancy. More info is at pitweb.pitzer.edu/event.

FINANCE CONFERENCE The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts the 2017 Claremont Finance Conference at 4:45 p.m. In this lecture, Erik Anderson will discuss his work at WestRiver, specifically his opinions about the biotechnology, software and telecommunications sectors. He will also share his thoughts on the direction of the global markets more generally, and specifically under President Trump. Mr. Anderson is the president of WestRiver, a venture capital firm specializing in early stage investments. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

 

Saturday, February 18

BEGINNERS BIRD WALK Join Chris Verma of Claremont’s Wild Birds Unlimited at 8 a.m. for a family-friendly, free bird walk along the trails at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave. Wear comfortable walking shoes, bring a bird guide and binoculars if you have them. Reservations are required via email at info@rsabg.org. More info is at rsabg.org/bird-walks or (909) 625-8767.

SEED COLLECTING WORKSHOP Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s Grow Native Nursery Workshops presents “Seed Collecting for the Home Gardener” from 10 to 11 a.m. at the garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Learn how to collect, store, and sow several types of California native plants’ seeds. More information is at rsabg.org/nursery-calendar or (909) 625-8767.

POETS IN DISTRESS Poets In Distress comes to Pomona’s Dope Spot, 219 E. Center St., for a free performance from noon to 5 p.m. “The Poets in Distress will touch down in their home base of Pomona for the Conjoined Beatniks Tour, which will highlight the talents of the continually revolving PID lineup,” a press release stated. The collective includes co-founders Brutus Chieftain and Chairman Craig Rick, King Daddy, Betty Nude, Steve Again, Tina Pasadena, Brother Jude, Jessica D’Arc and Mr. P. More information is at thedopespotstudios.com.

AFRICAN MASK MAKING The public is invited to celebrate Black History Month at the Claremont Public Library at 2 p.m. for a free family art activity on African art traditions. Participants will design masks, try Kente cloth weaving with paper and other activities. The library is at 208 N. Harvard Ave. The event is open to children ages 8 and up. For information, go to colapublib.org or call (909) 621-4902.

CONVERSATION WITH JASON ALEXANDER In a special event for Family Weekend 2017, Pomona College parent Jason Alexander talks about his career in entertainment and the performing arts, advocacy and philanthropy at 4:30 p.m. with Pomona College assistant professor of theatre and dance Carolyn Ratteray at Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way. The event is free but tickets are required and are available at pomona.edu/events. Mr. Alexander played the Emmy-nominated role of the neurotic George Costanza on the hit television comedy Seinfeld. On stage, he is a Tony Award winner for Jerome Robbins’ Broadway, starred in the critically-acclaimed The Producers and played Tevye in a Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof. More information is available at pomona.edu/events.

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Pomona College Orchestra conductor Eric Lindholm leads an ensemble of acclaimed southern California musicians, joined by Los Angeles Master Chorale soprano Hayden Eberhart in a free 8 p.m. concert featuring music by Haydn, Golijov, Stravinsky and J. Strauss, Jr. at Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

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