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CALENDAR: Crossroads fundraiser, free RSABG day, CST reunion, music and concerts

Friday, October 20

GET SOME FREE Pheminoise Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series gets started at 12:15 p.m. at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. This week’s concert features Pheminoise performs music by Liu and Martin with Rachel V. Huang (Scripps faculty), violin; Cynthia R. Fogg (Pomona faculty), viola; Tatiana Thibodeaux (Scripps staff accompanist), piano. The weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps’ and Pomona College’s music departments. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-3266.

MEALS ON WHEELS FUNDRAISER Claremont Meals on Wheels is having a fundraising and volunteer appreciation dinner from 4 to 10 p.m. at El Ranchero Restaurant, 984 Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Mention the charity to your server and it will receive 25% of sales from take out or dine in orders.

FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE The next-to-last Friday Nights Live features Swing Shift at Laemmle plaza; the Amazing Tone Benders at the chamber of commerce; beloved local b-side cover masters The Dogs at Shelton Park; and Mike’s Guitar World at city hall. Friday Nights Live runs from 6 to 9 p.m. through October 27. More info, including future lineups, is at claremontchamber.org.

CHS CHOIR SHOW Claremont High School’s choir department performs “Dance to the Music” at 7 p.m. at the school’s theater. All four CHS choirs will sing and dance to popular hits from several musical eras. The show repeats tomorrow, October 21 at 2:30 and 7 p.m. For more information call (909) 624-9053, extension 30462. For tickets visit chschoir.org.

Saturday, October 21

IT’S FREE DAY AT THE GARDEN! Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont, is free today, and kicking things off is a family bird walk from 8 to 9 a.m. Join Chris Verma of Claremont’s Wild Birds Unlimited for this family friendly walk along garden trails. Wear comfortable walking shoes, bring any bird guides you have and binoculars if you have them. It’s free, but reservations are required at rsabg.org/bird-walks, (909) 625-8767, or via email at info@rsabg.org. Also on tap today is the Garden’s Fall Planting Festival, which takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “It’s planting time for California native plants and we’re celebrating!” a Garden press release read. The seasonal opening of Grow Native Nursery includes free admission to the garden, a selection of native plants for sale and several free lectures, including “Ethnobotanical uses of the Native Plants of California,” with the aptly named Nicholas Hummingbird, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and “How to Water Your Plants for Drought Tolerant Establishment,” with Carlos Ruiz from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Lectures will be held in the Lenz classroom. More info is at rsabg.org or (909) 625-8767.

GREEN CREW TARGETS CHAPARRAL PARK Sustainable Claremont hosts another free and open to the public Green Crew tree planting event from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Chaparral Park, 1869 N. Mills Ave., Claremont. There will be a short presentation and tree planting demonstration at 8:30 a.m., followed by the group gardening event. For more information or to RSVP, email greencrew@sustainableclaremont.org or call (909) 625-8767, extension 238.

CROSSROADS FUNDRAISER Claremont-based charity Crossroads Women hosts its fall fundraiser at The Claremont School of Theology’s Mudd Theater, 1339 N. College Ave., from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Speaking at the event is Jelani Cobb, a scholar of African American history, mass incarceration, race and politics. Mr. Cobb is a professor at Columbia University, and has been a contributor to The New Yorker since 2012. He was recently featured in Ava DuVernay’s documentary, 13th, which highlighted the intersections of race, class, and gender in relation to mass incarceration. General admission tickets are $35, and students and formerly incarcerated persons are $20. Tickets are available at crossroadsinc.eventbrite.com or at Crossroads’ offices, 250 W. First St., Suite 254, Claremont. More info is at crossroadswomen.org.

ORCHESTRA IN FREE CONCERT The Claremont Concert Orchestra is playing a free, open to the public 8 p.m. show at Garrison Theatre, 241 E. Tenth St. Conductor David Cubek will present Brahms, Academic Festival Overture; Ruth Crawford Seeger, Andante for Strings and Rissolty, Rossolty; and Schubert, Symphony No. 3. More information is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-3267.

CST REUNION BRUNCH, LECTURE Claremont School of Theology’s Alumni/ae Reunion brunch and lecture takes place today at Mudd Theater, 1339 N. College Ave. The 11:30 a.m. brunch is $25. The Colwell Endowed Lecture, “Pump the Brakes Before It’s Too Late: An ethical, theological discussion of our rampant consumerist culture,” takes place at 1 p.m., and is free and open to the public. The lecture will be led by Dr. Grace Yia-Hei Kao of CST and Dr. Jow Bowersox III of Willamette University. More info is at cst.edu/event/oct21 or (909) 447-2545.

Sunday, October 22

JEWISH PROSE Claremont Public Library’s ongoing celebration of poetry continues with this month’s Fourth Sundays event, featuring Nan Cohen and Carol V. Davis in a free 2 p.m. reading. The library is at 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. Ms. Cohen is poetry director of the Napa Valley Writers’ Conference and the author of two books of poetry, Rope Bridge and Unfinished City, which was a finalist for the Koret Award for an Emerging Writer on Jewish Themes. Her poems have appeared in The New Republic, Slate, Ploughshares, Tikkun, Gulf Coast, and other magazines and anthologies. Ms. Davis is the author of Because I Cannot Leave This Body, Between Storms and the 2007 T.S. Eliot Prize winner, Into the Arms of Pushkin: Poems of St. Petersburg. Her first full-length collection, It’s Time to Talk About…, was published in a bilingual Russian/English edition in Russia in 1997. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Russia in 1996 and 2005. Her poetry has been read on NPR, Radio Russia and at the Library of Congress. Ms. Davis is poetry editor of the Los Angeles newspaper the Jewish Journal. Her work has been published in Mid-American Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, American Life in Poetry, Verse Daily and anthologies including Wide Awake: Poets of Los Angeles and Beyond and The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry. Light refreshments will be served and books will be available for purchase. Fourth Sundays events are always free and open to the public. More information is available at claremontlibrary.org.

RESPONDING TO IMMIGRANT SCAPEGOATING The Claremont League of Women Voters is hosting a fundraiser and lecture, “Food for Thought,” at 2 p.m. at the Alexander Hughes Center’s Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. Speaking is Jose Zapata Calderon, Professor Emeritas in Sociology and Chicano Studies from Pitzer College, sharing his experiences as a farm worker and academic. Over his career Mr. Calderon has worked to build partnerships between communities and higher education. The cost is $40 and the public is welcome. Register at claremont.ca.lwvnet.org.

BRAHMS FOR THE POOR Pomona and Scripps Colleges are offering two free and open to the public concerts featuring the music of Brahms. Pomona’s, “Music from Brahms’ Last Years,” with Gary Bovyer and Genevieve Feiwen Lee, gets underway at 3 p.m. at Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. The Claremont Concert Orchestra also performs at 3 p.m. at Garrison Theatre, Scripps College Performing Arts Center, 241 E. Tenth St., Claremont. At Little Bridges, Mr. Bovyer will be on clarinet and Ms. Lee will play the piano. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671. At Garrison, David Cubek (Scripps/Joint Music faculty) will conduct Brahms, Academic Festival Overture, with Ruth Crawford Seeger, Andante for Strings and Rissolty, Rossolty; and Schubert, Symphony No. 3. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-3267.

Monday, October 23

WHITE IDENTITY UNDER TRUMP The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “The Post-Election Politics of Identity,” with Zachary Courser. “Defying all political expectations and conventional norms, Trump’s vulgar pronouncements on race and gender and his signature lack of decorum did little to arrest his progress to the White House,” a press release read. CMC professor of government Zachary Courser will analyze how an emerging white racial identity group—combined with a coarsening of political rhetoric—helped elect Trump, and how the new politics of white identity shape his agenda. Mr. Courser is the research director of the Dreier Roundtable and a visiting assistant professor of government at CMC. He has published articles on the emergence of the Tea Party movement, and is a contributor and editor of the forthcoming volume Parchment Barriers: Political Polarization and the Limits of Constitutional Order. He has taught political science courses at a number of institutions, including the University of Virginia, CMC, Boston College and Washington and Lee University. In fall 2016, Mr. Courser established CMC’s Policy Lab, an innovative new undergraduate course focused on public policy analysis of real world problems in coordination with a Washington, DC think tank. He also has taught and researched internationally at Sciences Po Lyon in France, and worked as a senior program director and fellow for the Legatum Institute in London. He has experience working in Washington, DC, both on Capitol Hill and as the interim director of CMC’s Washington Program. He is a regular political commentator on Pasadena-based NPR affiliate KPCC’s long-running talk program, AirTalk with Larry Mantle, and frequently gives talks on American politics. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

HYMNS OF WISDOM The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Hymns of Wisdom: The Ismaili Ginans of South Asia,” with guest speaker Ali Asani. Mr. Asani will introduce the ginans, hymns of wisdom of the South Asia’s Ismaili communities, and their most important themes, including their ritual and performative contexts and the manner these have been impacted by a variety of political, social, and religious influences in colonial and postcolonial South Asia. Mr. Asani is professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures at Harvard University where he was both an undergraduate and graduate student. A specialist of Islam in South Asia, his research focuses on Shia and Sufi devotional literature and traditions in the region. Mr. Asani served as the director of Harvard’s Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Islamic Studies Program from 2010 to 2016 and now serves on the faculty of the departments of South Asian Studies and African and African-American Studies. He teaches a range of courses including “Understanding Islam and Contemporary Muslim Societies” and “Religion, Literature, and the Arts in Muslim Cultures,” among others. He also teaches about Muslim communities in the west. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Tuesday, October 24

UNIVERSITY CLUB The University Club of Claremont hosts an open to the public luncheon and discussion of  “Broadening Participation in Computing” with guest speaker Maria Klawe, president of Harvey Mudd College. The event starts at 11:30 a.m. at Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. A $20 meeting fee includes a buffet lunch. “Computing is one of the least diverse disciplines in science and engineering in terms of participation by women, African-Americans and Hispanics, and the only discipline where participation by women has significantly decreased over the last three decades,” a press release stated. “While our discipline does well in encouraging members of underrepresented groups to go on to graduate programs, we have been less successful in attracting members of these groups into undergraduate programs. This talk discusses successful strategies for significantly increasing the number of women and students of color majoring in computer science.” Ms. Klawe began her tenure as Harvey Mudd’s fifth—and first female—president in 2006. A renowned computer scientist and scholar, prior to joining Harvey Mudd, she held academic and administrative positions at Princeton University, the University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto. She also spent eight years with IBM Research in California. More information is available at universityclubofclaremont.org.

IMMIGRANT BACKLASH Claremont’s Scripps College’s Tuesday Noon lecture series continues with “Go Back to Where You Came From: the Backlash Against Immigration and the Fate of Western Democracy,” at 12:15 p.m. in the Hampton Room, Malott Commons, 345 E. Ninth St. Guest speaker Sasha Polakow-Suransky will explain how a recent surge in nativism, populism and xenophobia came to be and why the new right has grown so strong in countries that have historically been defenders of human rights and models of tolerance. “This climate has already helped propel Donald Trump to the White House, endangered Angela Merkel’s hopes of re-election in Germany, and put Marine Le Pen within striking distance of the Élysée Palace,” a press release stated. In his talk, Mr. Polakow-Suransky will show how xenophobia went mainstream and how the politicians embracing it rebranded themselves as defenders of Western liberal values to reshape the political landscape. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-1870.

FASCISTS, COMMUNISTS AND THE MASONS Pitzer College’s ongoing speaker series “Conspiracy Theory-Conspiracy Fact: Understanding a Perplexing Social Phenomenon,” continues at 4:15 p.m. with Lilith Mahmud, UC Irvine professor and author of The Brotherhood of Freemason Sisters: Gender, Secrecy, and Fraternity in Italian Masonic Lodges. The talk, “Fascists, Communists, and the Masons: Conspiracy Theorizing in the New World Order,” takes place at Benson Auditorium, 1050 N. Mills Ave., and is free and open to the public. More information is available at pitzer.edu/mcsi, (909) 621-8219, or via email at mcsi@pitzer.edu.

LABOR MARKET: HUMANS NEEDED The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Work’s Provocative Future,” with guest speaker George Anders. “As we head toward a world defined by self-driving cars, drone-powered warfare and AI-based chat bots, what’s left for humans to do?” a press release asked. Mr. Anders is the author of five books, including The New York Times bestseller Perfect Enough. Earlier in his career he spent two decades as a top feature writer for The Wall Street Journal, where he was part of a team that won a Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. In 2011, he served as a founding editor of Bloomberg View, writing editorials on a wide range of economic and social issues. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

FIERCE FEMINIST FILM A free, open screening of the documentary film Ovarian Psycos, and a conversation on activism in East Los Angeles, takes place at 6 p.m. at Garrison Theatre, Scripps College Performing Arts Center, 241 E. Tenth St., Claremont. The Ovarian Psycos Cycle Brigade is a fierce, feminist collective confronting injustice and building community in Los Angeles. Embracing the historic legacy of the Chicano/a civil rights movement that emerged in the 1960s, this cadre of activists is also the subject of Joanna Sokolowski and Kate Trumball-Lavalle’s documentary film. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-1870.

SENIOR COMPUTER CLUB Claremont Senior Computer Club meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd. The long-running group meets weekly to discuss general information about computers, tablets and smart phones. Each meeting provides an opportunity for questions to the group’s club experts. More information is at cscclub.org.

Wednesday, October 25

MINDFUL, SEXY AND SAFER SEX The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “Mindful + Sexy Safer Sex,” with guest speaker Kate McCombs. Ms. McCombs has traveled the world teaching sex and relationship education as well as empathic communication skills. Committed to helping people feel more comfortable talking about sex and feelings, her presentation will offer tools required to make mindful choices around safer sex practices, and much more. Ms. McCombs believes that meaningful conversations coupled with accurate information can help us create a healthier and more joy-filled world. In her presentation, Ms. McCombs will focus not only mindful choices around safer sex practices, but also offer tips on how to build a sexy and safe toolkit without compromising health or personal boundaries. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

CHINA’S ECOLOGICAL FUTURE The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Ecological Civilization: Is this the answer to fixing China’s environment?” with Christine Loh. Ms. Loh is an adjunct professor at the Institute for the Environment, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. As under secretary for the environment at the HKSAR, she focused on policy covering air quality, energy, climate change, nature conservation and green finance. Prior to that role she was CEO of the public policy think tank Civic Exchange, where she was instrumental in changing policy with respect to air quality, including working closely with mainland Chinese counterparts in defining a new marine emissions control policy.  More info is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Thursday, October 26

NOVELIST BRADLEY ROSEN Author and native son Bradley Rosen will read from and sign copies of his new novel, Bunkie Spills, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Folk Music Center, 220 Yale Ave., Claremont. The free event includes music by Stacy Rosen-Sturgis and Steve Sturgis and more, and dessert and coffee. Mr. Rosen’s recently published book, on Small Doggies Press, is set in Claremont in 1976. He grew up in Claremont, and now lives in Portland, OR. Chuck Palahniuk, the author of Fight Club, said, “Bunkie Spills gives us some of the freshest, most frenetic, kinetic, prophetic, dynamic, slam-bam, cut-loose writing in years. Brad’s voice, his voice is Salinger-only-better, a young Barry Hannah, a slacker Fitzgerald. Here is someone new worth reading." Books will be available for sale and signing after the reading. More info is at folkmusiccenter.com or (909) 624-2928.

WHY CAMPUS FREE SPEECH MATTERS The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “Why Free Speech Matters on Campus,” with guest speaker Keith E. Whittington. Mr. Whittington will argue that robust protection of free speech and civil discourse is essential for universities to fulfill their distinct and important mission to assemble and nurture an open and diverse community of scholars, teachers and students dedicated to the production and dissemination of knowledge. “Understanding the relationship between the critical functions of the university and the principles of free speech can help provide guidance in resolving the difficult challenges that confront modern universities,” a press release stated. Mr. Whittington is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University. He is the author of Political Foundations of Judicial Supremacy: The Presidency, the Supreme Court, and Constitutional Leadership in U.S. History and Constitutional Construction: Divided Powers and Constitutional Meaning, among others. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

CELEBRATING THE UN The United Nations is turning 72, and its Pomona Valley chapter is throwing a free and open to the public party to celebrate. The 7 p.m. event, “Global Goals, Local Leaders,” at Pomona College’s Edmunds Ballroom, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., will feature music from vocalist Claudia Lennear with Glenn Kishi, and will highlight the work of three grassroots organizations: Hope Partners, feeding the hungry and sheltering the homeless; Refugee Resettlement Teams, assisting refugees throughout Pomona Valley; and Students for Sustainability. Dan Thomas, special adviser for communications and advocacy for  UNICEF, will discuss international work in the areas of poverty, refugees and sustainability. Middle Eastern refreshments will be offered. Sponsored by the United Nations Association of Pomona Valley and the Pomona College International Relations Program with support from many organizations. For information call (909) 625- 9670 or go to pv.una-socal.org.

NEW YORK’S HASIDIC CITY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “American Shtetl: A Hasidic Town in Suburban New York,” with guest speaker David N. Myers. Mr. Myers will explore the curious case of Kiryas Joel, a legally-recognized municipality in the state of New York. Is this community’s existence consistent with or is it a deviation from the American legal and political tradition? He is a professor of Jewish history at UCLA and is serving as the inaugural director of the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy. Mr. Myers’ books include Re-Inventing the Jewish Past, Resisting History: The Crisis of Historicism in German-Jewish Thought and the forthcoming The Stakes of Jewish History: On the Use and Abuse of Jewish History for Life. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

CITIZEN SCIENCE Harvey Mudd College’s Distinguished Speaker Series continues with a free, open lecture, “Citizen Science,” at 7 p.m. at Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. “Citizen science movements challenge the world to consider radical, new relationships among scientists and engineers and non-experts,” a press release read. A dessert reception will follow the lecture. More info is at hmc.edu/calendar or (909) 607-0943.

CELLO AND SITAR CONCERT Harvey Mudd College’s concert series continues with Sangam Sitar and Cello at 7 p.m. at Drinkward Recital Hall, 320 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Paul Livingstone and Peter Jacobson’s unique duo straddles Indian raga and European classical music. More info is at hmc.edu/calendar or (909) 621-8022.

LIFE IS A CABARET Pomona College mounts a version of the 1966 Broadway smash Cabaret at 8 p.m. at Seaver Theatre, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tickets are $11 for general admission and $6 for students, seniors, staff and alumni. “Welcome to the infamous Kit Kat Klub, where the Emcee, Sally Bowles and a slew of characters from different walks of life and cultures take the stage nightly to tantalize the crowd to leave their troubles outside,” a press release read. Tickets and/or more information is available at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-4380.

Friday, October 27

ANTICIPATION IN MACROECONOMICS The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free noon lecture, “The Importance of Anticipation in Macroeconomics,” with guest speaker Valerie Ramey. Ms. Ramey will discuss how expectations, forecasts and generalized anticipation affect the course of the macroeconomy and determine the impact of macroeconomic policy. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

CHORAL COLLECTIVE Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series gets started at 12:15 p.m. at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave. This week’s show, De/Reconstructing America: The Contemporary Choral Collective of Los Angeles. LA’s premiere ensemble specializing in new choral music features Alexandra Grabarchuk (Scripps), conductor; David Harris, conductor; David Rentz (Pomona), conductor; and Fahad Siadat, conductor. The weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps’ and Pomona College’s music departments. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-3266.

FRIDAY NIGHTS WINDS UP Claremont’s free Friday Nights Live concert series winds up tonight with season-capping performances from Beatles tribute act Fab 8 at Laemmle plaza; the Jackson Family at the chamber; original rock ‘n’ roll from Mick Rhodes and the Hard Eight at Shelton Park; and Random Spark at city hall. Shows run from 6 to 9 p.m. That’s it for this year; Next year’s concert series begins in May.

Saturday, October 28

GOT ART FOR PILGRIM FEST? The fourth annual art donation party, Got Art?, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Pilgrim Place’s Fine Arts Studio, 698 Scrooby Lane, Claremont. Please bring your framed or unframed wall art to donate to help support the 2017 Pilgrim Place Festival’s fine arts booth. Everyone is welcome and refreshments will be served. For more information call (909) 399-5500.

ZOMBIE BAND: STILL BRAINY AFTER ALL THESE YEARS The 17th appearance of the ghoulish collective known as The Zombie Band hits the stage at 10 p.m. for a free show at the Press, 129 Harvard Ave. This year’s undead include Joe Atman on bloody keys and vocals; Drew McNevin, vocals and ghoulish guitar; Arron Acerro, still more ghoulish guitar; Jon Crawford, freshly dead drums; Nick Maury, graveyard bass; Joshua Rodriguez, more graveyard bass; Jim Carlson, blood-curdling guitar; and Ed Tessier and Melissa Moultrie, terrifying guest vocals. More information is at thepressrestaurant.com.

VILLAGE VENTURE The 36th annual Village Venture takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Venture features arts and crafts, international food, live entertainment and a children’s Halloween costume parade at 10 a.m. Kids should assemble prior to 10 a.m. at Claremont Chamber of Commerce, 205 Yale Ave. Parking for Village Venture is always dicey, as most Village streets are closed. Free shuttle service is provided from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., with pick-up locations at Claremont University facilities at First Street, Taylor Hall at Cahuilla Park and St. Ambrose Episcopal Church at Bonita and Mountain Avenues. More info is available at claremontchamber.org.