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CALENDAR 9-day: Academic freedom, climate science, bird walk, Artsmooch, concerts

Friday, February 16

ACADEMIC FREEDOM IN TURKEY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “Authoritarian Consolidation and the Criminalization of Knowledge Production in the Middle East,” with guest speaker Asli Ü. Bâli. In this talk, Ms. Bâli, a professor at UCLA Law School, will examine the ways in which authoritarian consolidation in Turkey has produced new frameworks through which rule-of-law discourse is inverted and deployed to undermine rather than protect academic freedom. She will then examine the ways in which similar frameworks have been developed across a number of other contexts in the Middle East and conclude with some reflections on why incipient forms of populist authoritarianism across the region have come to treat knowledge production as a particularly dangerous threat. Ms. Bâli is faculty director of the Promise Institute for Human Rights, director of the UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies, and professor of law at the UCLA School of Law where she teaches in the International and Comparative Law Program. Her scholarship has appeared in The American Journal of International Law Unbound, International Journal of Constitutional Law, UCLA Law Review, Yale Journal of International Law, Virginia Journal of International Law, as well as numerous edited volumes published by Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press. Her edited volume, Constitution Writing, Religion and Democracy, was published in 2017. She currently serves as co-chair of the Advisory Committee for Human Rights Watch-Middle East. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

BEETHOVEN AT NOON Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues today with Beethoven, Sonata in G Major, Op. 96. The show at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with performers Sarah Thornblade (Pomona), on violin and Gayle Blankenburg (Pomona/Scripps) playing the piano. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

10-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL The Claremont Colleges’ free and open to the public 10-Minute Play Festival kicks off at 3 p.m. at Seaver Theatre, Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Each year, all members of The Claremont Colleges community are invited to submit new plays inspired by a common theme. This year’s theme is “Environmental Justice.” Winners are selected in December, and the department produces the plays with student directors and performers. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-4380.

CLIMATE SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM Pitzer College’s Robert Redford Conservancy for Southern California Sustainability hosts a free and open symposium, “Climate Change, Climate Justice: Organizing in the Face of a Changing Planet,” from 3 to 5 p.m. at Benson Auditorium, Pitzer College, 1050 N. Mills Ave., Claremont. The event brings together climate scientists, climate justice activists and the public to envision a more hopeful and fossil fuel free future. It features three speakers: Geeta Persad, Stanford University climate scientist; Ryan Camero, climate justice artist-activist; and Nwamaka Agbo, Movement Strategy Center new economy innovation fellow. More information is at pitzer.edu/event.

CRYPTOCURRENCIES AND BLOCKCHAIN DISRUPTION The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:45 p.m. event, the 2018 Claremont Finance Conference, “Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Disruption,” with guest speaker Kavita Gupta. At ConsenSys Ventures, Ms. Gupta heads a unique VC-Hedge Fund, investing in next-generation Ethereum Blockchain technologies revolutionizing current systems. Ms. Gupta is a recipient of the UN Social Finance Innovator Award in 2015 for being an integral part of the founding Green Bond team at The World Bank. Over her 16-year career, she has established innovative investment funds across East Africa, the Middle East, South Asia and most recently in the US through World Bank, IFC, McKinsey and The Schmidt Family Office. Previously, she ran a $250 million fund aligned with UN SDGs, infusing capital into projects that would provide first-time or low-cost access to technologies around the world. She also founded and headed the World Bank’s first innovation fund in 2010, and led the mission investing for the family foundation of Alphabet Inc.’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt. She sits on the board of advisors of various accelerators and foundations across the world, including Google’s Social Track accelerator, MIT Solve, the Vatican’s Right Now Foundation for Impact Investments, the Mandela Foundation, and others. She is an MIT and Media Lab alum. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

Saturday, February 17

THE BIRDS Fans of our feathered friends are invited to a free family bird walk from 8 to 9:30 a.m. this morning at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Join Chris Verma of Claremont’s Wild Birds Unlimited for this family-friendly walk along Garden trails. Participants are asked to wear comfortable walking shoes and to bring binoculars or bird guides if possible. The free walk is sponsored by Wild Birds Unlimited. Reservations are required at rsabg.org/bird-walks, by phone at (909) 625-8767, or via email at info@rsabg.org.

EAT A PEACH Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, at 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont, hosts a Grow Native Nursery Workshop from 10 to 11 a.m., “Growing and Eating California Native Plants.” Participants will learn how to grow and maintain native plants for use in the kitchen and tap into incredible flavors in a responsible and green way. More info is at rsabg.org/nursery-calendar or (909) 625-8767.

ARTSMOOCH AT SCRIPPS Claremont’s Scripps College presents ArtSmooch, a free and open 3 p.m. event at Garrison Theatre, 241 E. 10th St. ArtSmooch is a multidisciplinary showcase of student, faculty and visiting artist work, an interplay of original poetry, music, visual art and dance composed for the occasion. The performance will feature collaborations between students Elena Dypiangco, Cynthia Irobunda, Rachel Nayer, Zara K. Singh, Madeline T. Sy and Kathryn Chan; Scripps faculty members Ronnie Brosterman, Rachel Huang, Kasper Kovitz, Warren Liu and Kevin Williamson; Harvey Mudd’s Bill Alves; Pitzer’s Micah Huang; visual artist Sumi Foley; and Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award-winner Angie Estes. This program is presented as part of Scripps College’s Family Weekend and sponsored by the Office of Parent Engagement and Philanthropy, the O’Brien Lecture Fund and the Bice Funds. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-1870.

Sunday, February 18

BIRD FEST AT GARDEN Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, at 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont, hosts a family bird festival from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. “During the year, over 150 different species of birds may visit the Garden,” a press release read. “How many will you see? Take the Migration Challenge, make avian art, pose with a live raptor and enjoy many other activities.” The event is free with general admission, and is sponsored by Wild Birds Unlimited and the Pomona Valley Audubon Society. More info is at rsabg.org or (909) 625-8767.

POETRY AT THE GREEN The community is invited to the community room at Claremont Village Green, 630 W. Bonita Ave., for a free and open to the public poetry reading from 5 to 7 p.m. The event is for readers and listeners, and all types of poetry or prose are welcome. Email mari_werner@yahoo.com for more information.

Monday, February 19

IT’S A BEAUTIFUL DAY It was 45 years ago today the beloved PBS children’s show Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood made its national TV debut. Fred Rogers, who died in 2003 at 74, aimed to promote self esteem, self control, imagination, creativity, curiosity, appreciation of diversity, cooperation, patience and persistence among his viewers. If his gentle, low-tech and soothing style was unusual then, it is by now almost unthinkable for a television host in any genre. In tribute to Mr. Rogers, I’d like to dispel a rumor to which even I fell prey until recently: Mr. Rogers was never a military sniper, and he wore sweaters on the show because he liked the dang sweaters (and many were made by his mother), not because he had tattoos all over his arms, one for each person he had killed. In truth, he never served in the military and was a pacifist. You’re welcome.

GAMELAN CONCERT, LECTURE Pomona College hosts a free and open to the public Balinese Gamelan lecture/demo with Gamelan Çudamani at 4:15 p.m. Gamelan Çudamani comes from a family compound in the village of Pengosekan, in Ubud, Bali, and is one of Bali’s most active and respected performing ensembles. The hypnotic, harmonically un-Western concert takes place at Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

MULTI-VENUE ORGAN FEST The Los Angeles Chapter of the American Guild of Organists brings the 11th annual Los Angeles Presidents’ Day Organ Festival to Claremont, with free and open performances across town all day. The party starts at 9 a.m. at Claremont Presbyterian Church, 1111 N. Mountain Ave., with coffee and pastries. Performances begin at 9:30 a.m. and run to 10:45. The organ jams start at 11:10 a.m. and run until noon at Pomona College’s Thatcher Music Building, Lyman Recital Hall, 340 N. College Ave. From 1:10 to 1:35 p.m., the spectacular Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., hosts a concert. Pipe organ fans can then make their way over to the final show of the festival at Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 Harrison Ave. from 1:50 to 3:30 p.m., with a reception to follow. Featured organists are Gerard DeMasi, Leslie Deutsch, Jung-A Lee, Thomas Mellan, William Peterson, Carey Robertson, Russell Weismann, Gerard DeMasi, William Peterson and Carey Robertson. Box lunches are available for $10 with advance reservation at laago.org, where you can also find the schedule.

CHOOSING JUSTICES The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 6:45 p.m. lecture, “Picking for Keeps: Shaping the Future, One Justice at a Time,” with guest speaker Ronald Klain. “The process of selecting and confirming life-tenured Supreme Court justices—and other federal judges—can shape our laws and society for decades,” a press release read. “Long after a president is gone, the individuals appointed to the federal bench are still determining life and society altering matters with wide-ranging implications. How does a president decide whom to entrust with this power? How should the senate exercise its role providing its ‘advice and consent’ to these selections?” Mr. Klain, a veteran of the selection and confirmation of eight Supreme Court justices, discusses these questions and his ideas for reform of the contentious and consequential process. Mr. Klain has devoted many years to public service, most recently as White House Ebola Response Coordinator (2014-15). Earlier, he served as a senior White House aide to President Obama responsible for implementing the Recovery Act, and as chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden from 2009 to 2011. He has also served as chief of staff for Vice President Al Gore, chief of staff and counselor to Attorney General Janet Reno, staff director of the Senate Democratic Leadership Committee, and chief counsel of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Mr. Klain was associate counsel to President Clinton in charge of judicial selection. Through his work on the judiciary committee and in the executive branch, he has played a role in the selection or confirmation of eight Supreme Court justices. Mr. Klain gained national notice as general counsel for the Gore Recount Committee in 2000, in recognition of which he was selected as one of National Law Journal’s lawyers of the year, and featured in HBO’s film Recount. He has worked on seven presidential campaigns, serving as a top debate preparation advisor to Presidents Obama and Clinton, and Democratic presidential nominees Al Gore, John Kerry and Hillary Clinton. Mr. Klain is a graduate of Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review, and Georgetown University, where he has served since 2011 as an adjunct professor. Mr. Klain is the featured speaker for CMC’s 2018 Family Weekend. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/ open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Tuesday, February 20

IMMIGRATION LAWYERS’ CHALLENGES Scripps College’s fascinating and free Tuesday Noon series continues with “Inside the Immigrant Defenders Law Center,” with guest speaker Lindsay Tolczylowski, at 12:15 p.m. at Hampton Room, Malott Commons, 345 E. Ninth St., Claremont. “As a founding member and executive director at the Immigrant Defenders Law Center, Ms. Tolczylowski has helped lead the push for awareness and protection of immigrant rights to a fair trial and due process,” a press release read.  Ms. Tolczylowski, formerly of the Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project and Asylum Access, will discuss the ways the US legal system “systematically and unfairly denies basic legal principles to immigrants facing deportation.” More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-1870.

YEAH, IT’S YAA GYASI AT SCRIPPS The wonderfully diverse and interesting ongoing free lecture series Scripps Presents brings “Yaa Gyasi in Conversation” to Garrison Theatre at Scripps College, 241 E. 10th St., at 6 p.m. Winning praise from Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxane Gay and Trevor Noah, among others, as “a singular literary experience,” Ms. Gyasi’s Homegoing begins in 18th century Ghana with the story of two half-sisters whose lives take wildly different turns. Ms. Gyasi tackles the specter of slavery across eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. The PEN/Hemingway Award- and National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Award-winner visits Scripps to discuss her work and contemporary literature with Myriam J. A. Chancy, who is Scripps’ Hartley Burr Alexander Chair in the Humanities. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/ events or (909) 607-1870.

SCIENCE AND THE AFTERLIFE The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 6:45 p.m. lecture, “Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality and Utopia,” with guest speaker Michael Shermer. In his newest book, Heavens on Earth, Mr. Shermer, publisher of Skeptic Magazine, monthly columnist for Scientific American and presidential fellow at Chapman University, set out to discover what drives humans’ belief in life after death, focusing on recent scientific attempts (such as radical life extension to cryonic suspension to mind uploading) to achieve immortality. Mr. Shermer is the author of New York Times bestsellers Why People Believe Weird Things, The Believing Brain, Why Darwin Matters, The Science of Good and Evil and The Moral Arc. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

Wednesday, February 21

EXPLORING WAGNER The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 6:45 p.m. lecture from The New Yorker music critic Alex Ross, “Wagnerian Modernism.” Mr. Ross will examine Wagner’s ambiguous presence among literary modernists, particularly James Joyce and Virginia Woolf. He has been a music critic for The New Yorker since 1996. His first book, The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century, won a National Book Critics Circle award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. More info is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

Thursday, February 22

THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “The Future of Healthcare in America,” with guest speaker Thomas Miller, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC, where he studies healthcare policy, including regulatory barriers to choice and competition, market-based alternatives to the Affordable Care Act, healthcare litigation and the political economy of healthcare reform. More info is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE Scripps College’s free and open to the public Open Government lecture series, “Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World,” kicks off with “Making a Difference through Ethics,” with Sabine Romero, from noon to 1 p.m. at Vita Nova Hall 100, 385 E. Ninth St., Claremont. Ms. Romero will discuss making a difference in the world through open government and ethics.  Dessert will be provided. More information is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE: LOCALLY, NATIONALLY Scripps College’s Open Government lecture series, “Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World,” continues with “Making a Difference on the Local and National Stages,” with Sabine Romero and Hilda Solis from 3 to 4 p.m. at Humanities Auditorium, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Sabine Romero and Hilda Solis, LA County supervisor and former Secretary of Labor under President Barack Obama, will host a discussion about how involvement at the federal and local level makes an impact. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

LSD FOR MENTAL HEALTH Scripps Presents brings us a fascinating and free 6 p.m. lecture with Ayelet Waldman, “A Really Good Day,” at Garrison Theatre at Scripps College, 241 E. 10th St., Claremont. “When it comes to mental health and self care, the literature is plentiful,” a press release read. “That’s why Ayelet Waldman’s A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life is such a revelation. Waldman’s approach, taking miniscule doses of LSD to manage her mood disorder, is unorthodox, but her brand of wit and unapologetic candor is invigorating. A former public defender and an adjunct professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law, Ms. Waldman, who developed and taught a course on the legal implications of the ‘war on drugs,’ brings her professional experience to bear in this deeply personal reflection.” Medaya Ocher, managing editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books, joins her for a conversation. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-1870.

ECONOMIC DISCONTENTS The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 6:45 p.m. lecture, “Today’s Economy and Its Discontents,” from N. Gregory Mankiw, professor of economics, Harvard University.  Mr. Mankiw has written two popular textbooks—the intermediate-level textbook Macroeconomics and the introductory textbook Principles of Economics. He has been a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, an adviser to the Congressional Budget Office and the Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and New York, and a member of the ETS test development committee for the advanced placement exam in economics. From 2003 to 2005 he served as chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. More information is at cmc.edu/ athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Friday, February 23

COURIER ALUM AUTHOR TALK Pilgrim Congregational Church Memorial Library invites the public to attend its annual free and open library coffee at 10 a.m. The event features a talk from former COURIER staff writer Chris Bray, author of Court-Martial: How Military Justice Has Shaped America from the Revolution to 9/11 and Beyond. Pilgrim Congregational Church is at 600 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. Refreshments will be served. More info is at pilgrimchurchpomona.com or (909) 622-1373.

NETWORKS FOR WOMEN The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “From Mid-Quad to the White House: The Power of Networks to Build Inside and Outside Power,” with guest speaker Archana Sahgal. Delivering the keynote for 2018 Women and Leadership Workshop, Ms. Sahgal, former senior associate director for the Office of Public Engagement at The White House, will share experiences from her time at CMC to the White House and beyond. She served in the Obama White House as senior associate director for public engagement where she led stakeholder engagement with organized labor and progressive advocates around President Obama’s policy priorities. Ms. Sahgal also worked with other philanthropic efforts including The San Francisco Foundation, Rosenberg Foundation, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy, Proteus Fund, The Progressive Era Project and George Soros’ Open Society Foundations directing over $15 million in resources to push for immigration reform. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

CLASSICS AT NOON Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues today with music by Schubert and Luis Rosalebron. The show at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with performers John Gilmour (Scripps) and Tatiana Thibodeaux (Scripps), piano. Sponsored by the departments of music at Pomona and Scripps Colleges. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE: BUSINESS AND NONPROFITS Scripps College’s ongoing “Open Government: Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World” lecture series continues with “Making a Difference through Business and Nonprofits,” with Sabine Romero, from noon to 1 p.m. at Humanities Auditorium, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Scripps College Lois Langland Alumna-in-Residence Sabine Romero will lead a discussion about making a difference in the world through business, nonprofits and corporate philanthropy. “How do corporations make a difference in our communities?” a press release asked. “How do their efforts affect how we govern ourselves?” Dessert will be provided. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE: CIVIC PARTICIPATION Scripps College’s “Open Government: Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World” series rolls on with a film screening and lecture, “An Inconvenient Sequel: Making a Difference through Civic Participation” with Sabine Romero. The talk gets underway at 7 p.m. at Humanities Auditorium, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Scripps College Lois Langland Alumna-in-Residence, Ms. Romero, will lead a screening of An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, written by former Vice President Al Gore, followed by a discussion of how civic participation makes a difference in the world. Movie snacks will be provided. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

ORCHESTRA, SOPRANO IN CONCERT Pomona College Orchestra, with Eric Lindholm conducting, plays a free show at 8 p.m. tonight and 3 p.m. Sunday at Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. Joining the orchestra is 2017 Concerto Competition winner, soprano Briana Grether. Ms. Grether will perform Knoxville Summer of 1915 by Barber. Also on the program is Saint-Georges’ Symphony in G, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7. Ms. Grether is currently in her fourth and final year at Pomona College, graduating in May with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology. After graduation, she plans to become certified as a nurse practitioner, and hopes to join an aid organization such as Doctors Without Borders. She has sung in choral ensembles since elementary school, and fell in love with Samuel Barber’s work in her high school chamber choir in Lafayette, California. More info is at pomona.edu/events.

Saturday, February 24

MASTER OF PUPPETS Claremont Public Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., offers a free and open to the public workshop, “The Art of Puppeteering,” at 2 p.m. “Have you ever wanted to create a puppet, be a ventriloquist, or just wondered how puppeteering works?” a press release asked. “Come to learn about the art and science of puppeteering. Claremont artists Eddie Gonzalez and April Shenkman will show you how to design a functional puppet that is camera ready, and talk about how to create voices and bring your character to life!” For more information, call (909) 621-4902 or visit colapublib.org.

BANKING ON BEAUTY Author Adam Arenson will give a free talk on his new book, Banking on Beauty: Millard Sheets and Midcentury Commercial Architecture in California, at 7:30 p.m. in Balch Auditorium, Scripps College, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Mr. Arenson’s expansively researched and illustrated work provides a lively history of the extraordinary partnership of financier Howard Ahmanson and artist Millard Sheets, which produced mid-century modern architecture and art for Home Savings and Loan and other commercial clients. A book signing and refreshments will follow the lecture, hosted by Claremont Heritage, the Claremont Museum of Art and Scripps College Fine Arts Foundation. Go to for adamarenson.com for more information.

MAKE A DIFFERNCE: ACCOUNTABILITY Scripps College’s Open Government: Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World” series wraps up at 6 p.m. at Motley Coffeehouse, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, with “Making a Difference through Accountability.” The lecture features Sabine Romero, Bob Duke and Rebecca McInroy, the latter two stars of the podcast, Two Guys on Your Head. The University of Texas at Austin-based psychology podcast explores different aspects of human behavior and the brain, covering everything from the effects of sugar to what’s happening in our minds while we sleep. This event will focus on accountability: is it personal? Is it societal? Should it be voluntary? How can you harness this value to make a difference in the world? More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

MARIACHI LOS BRONCOS DE POMONA Pomona College’s jewel box venue, Bridges Hall of Music, at 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont, brings us a free and open concert with Mariachi Los Broncos de Pomona at 8 p.m. Mariachi Los Broncos de Pomona, under the direction of Jessie M. Vallejo, is the premiere mariachi ensemble at Cal Poly Pomona and was one of the first college mariachi groups in the United States. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.