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CALENDAR 9-day: Author talk, puppet masters, music, concerts, civil rights, art of pop

Friday, February 23

AUTHOR TALK Pilgrim Congregational Church Memorial Library invites the public to attend its annual free and open library coffee at 10 a.m. The event features a talk from former COURIER staff writer Chris Bray, author of Court-Martial: How Military Justice Has Shaped America from the Revolution to 9/11 and Beyond. Pilgrim Congregational Church is at 600 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. Refreshments will be served, followed by Mr. Bray’s talk. More info is at pilgrimchurchpomona.com or (909) 622-1373.

THE POWER OF FEMALEW NETWORKS The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 11:45 a.m. lecture, “From Mid-Quad to the White House: The Power of Networks to Build Inside and Outside Power,” with guest speaker Archana Sahgal, who works at the intersection of politics and movement building to create social change. Her network has helped her navigate the opportunities and challenges along the way. Ms. Sahgal has spent two decades designing and executing strategies for achieving policy reform and social change within the philanthropic, nonprofit and public sectors. She served in the Obama White House as senior associate director for public engagement, where she led stakeholder engagement with organized labor and progressive advocates around President Obama’s policy priorities. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

CLASSICS AT NOON Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues today with music by Schubert and Luis Rosalebron. The show at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with performers John Gilmour (Scripps) and Tatiana Thibodeaux (Scripps), piano. Sponsored by the departments of music at Pomona and Scripps Colleges. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. The weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps and the Pomona College Music Department. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

BUSINESS, NONPROFITS Scripps College’s ongoing “Open Government: Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World” lecture series continues with “Making a Difference through Business and Nonprofits,” with Sabine Romero, from noon to 1 p.m. at Humanities Auditorium, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Scripps College Sabine Romero will lead a discussion about making a difference in the world through business, nonprofits and corporate philanthropy. Dessert will be provided. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

JAPANESE PRINT SHOW Pilgrim Place’s Petterson Museum of Intercultural Art, at 730 Plymouth Rd., Claremont, hosts a free exhibition, “Expressions of Faith: The Religious Works of Sadao Watanabe” from 2 to 4 p.m. The show continues through Sunday. Mr. Watanabe was a Japanese printmaker in the 20th century, known for his biblical prints rendered in the mingei (folk art) tradition. He was a student of the master textile dye artist Serizawa Keisuke (1895–1984). The works on display are on loan from personal collections and Petterson’s permanent collection. For more information call (909) 399-5544.

CIVIC PARTICIPATION Scripps College’s “Open Government: Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World” series rolls on with a film screening and lecture, “An Inconvenient Sequel: Making a Difference through Civic Participation” with Sabine Romero. The talk gets underway at 7 p.m. at Humanities Auditorium, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Scripps College’s Ms. Romero will lead a screening of An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, written by former Vice President Al Gore, followed by a discussion of how civic participation makes a difference in the world. Movie snacks will be provided. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

ORCHESTRA, SOPRANO Pomona College Orchestra, with Eric Lindholm conducting, plays a free show at 8 p.m. tonight and 3 p.m. Sunday at Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. Joining the orchestra is 2017 Concerto Competition winner, soprano Briana Grether. Ms. Grether will perform Knoxville Summer of 1915 by Barber. Also on the program is Saint-Georges’ Symphony in G, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7. Ms. Grether is currently in her fourth and final year at Pomona College, and hopes to join an aid organization such as Doctors Without Borders. More info is at pomona.edu/events.

Saturday, February 24

MASTER OF PUPPETS Claremont Public Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., offers a free and open to the public workshop, “The Art of Puppeteering,” at 2 p.m. “Have you ever wanted to create a puppet, be a ventriloquist, or just wondered how puppeteering works?” a press release asked. “Come to learn about the art and science of puppeteering. Claremont artists Eddie Gonzalez and April Shenkman will show you how to design a functional puppet that is camera ready, and talk about how to create voices and bring your character to life!” For more information, call (909) 621-4902 or visit colapublib.org.

ACCOUNTABILITY Scripps College’s Open Government: Ten Ways to Make a Difference in the World” series wraps up at 6 p.m. at Motley Coffeehouse, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, with “Making a Difference through Accountability.” The lecture features Sabine Romero, Bob Duke and Rebecca McInroy, the latter two stars of the podcast, Two Guys on Your Head. The University of Texas at Austin-based psychology podcast explores different aspects of human behavior and the brain, covering everything from the effects of sugar to what’s happening in our minds while we sleep. This event will focus on accountability: is it personal? Is it societal? Should it be voluntary? How can you harness this value to make a difference in the world? More info is at scrippscollege.edu/llair2018 or (909) 607-1536.

BANKING ON BEAUTY Author Adam Arenson will give a free talk on his new book, Banking on Beauty: Millard Sheets and Midcentury Commercial Architecture in California, at 7:30 p.m. in Balch Auditorium, Scripps College, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. Mr. Arenson’s expansively researched and illustrated work provides a lively history of the extraordinary partnership of financier Howard Ahmanson and artist Millard Sheets, which produced mid-century modern architecture and art for Home Savings and Loan and other commercial clients. A book signing and refreshments will follow the lecture, hosted by Claremont Heritage, the Claremont Museum of Art and Scripps College Fine Arts Foundation. Go to adamarenson.com for more information.

MARIACHI LOS BRONCOS DE POMONA Pomona College’s jewel box venue, Bridges Hall of Music, at 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont, brings us a free and open concert with Mariachi Los Broncos de Pomona at 8 p.m. Mariachi Los Broncos de Pomona, under the direction of Jessie M. Vallejo, is the premiere mariachi ensemble at Cal Poly Pomona and was one of the first college mariachi groups in the United States. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-2671.

Sunday, February 25

ART OF POP The Art of Pop show, celebrating pop culture artists and their creations, runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Claremont Packing House, 532 W. First St., Claremont. Admission and parking are free. The event will feature and celebrate local artists, writers, filmmakers, musicians and others actively producing work in the pop culture oeuvre. Go to the event page on Facebook for more information.

CIVIL RIGHTS CONVERSATION Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way, Claremont, hosts an in-depth and free 2 p.m. conversation with local treasure Myrlie Evers-Williams and the Reverend James M. Lawson, Jr., moderated by Lorn Foster. A community reception will follow the inaugural Payton Distinguished Lectureship event. Ms. Evers-Williams is a civil rights activist whose early work focused on registering black voters and ending racial segregation in schools and public facilities in Mississippi. In 1987, she was appointed to the Los Angeles Board of Public Works as a commissioner, the first black woman to serve in that capacity. She was a board member of the NAACP and served as its chair from 1995-1998. She was awarded the NAACP Spingarn Medal in 1998, and in 2009 received the National Freedom Award from the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. She has received seven honorary doctorates. Ms. Evers-Williams has published several books on topics related to civil rights and her activist husband Medgar Evers’ legacy, and in 1998 founded the Medgar Evers Institute (now named the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Institute) in Jackson, Mississippi. Medgar Evers was assassinated in 1963. The following summer Ms. Evers-Williams came to Claremont to attend Pomona College. The Reverend James Lawson, Jr. was a leading tactician in the civil rights movement and chief organizer of its nonviolent resistance to racism. Inspired by his experiences as a Methodist missionary to Nagpur, India, Rev. Lawson studied Gandhi’s principles of nonviolence. While a theology student at Oberlin College in Ohio, he was introduced to Martin Luther King, Jr., who urged him to come to the South. Later he served as the southern director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and conducted nonviolence training workshops for members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He has continued to train activists in nonviolence and has worked for numerous human rights causes, including immigrants’ rights and workers’ rights to a living wage. His current project is “Black Immigration to Los Angeles, 1900-1950 and The Role of the African American Church in Social Mobility,” a study of eight African American churches during the first half of the 20th century and how they shaped both the sacred and secular lives of African Americans in the community.  The Pomona College Board of Trustees endowed the John A. Payton ’73 Distinguished Lectureship in memory of John Payton’s life and influential career as a renowned civil rights attorney, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and a member of the Pomona College Board of Trustees, and in honor of David W. Oxtoby, ninth president of Pomona College. More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 607-1139.

50 YEARS OF CHARITY Inland Valley Hope Partners celebrates 50 years of service in Pomona with a kickoff event from 2 to 4 p.m. at First Christian Church, 1751 N. Park Ave., Pomona. To RSVP, call (909) 622-3806, extension 104, or email coriea@inlandvalleyhopepartners.org.

Monday, February 26

THE PROFITLESS AND NONPROFITS The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 12:15 p.m. lecture, “Media Trends: The Profitless and the Non-Profits,” with guest speaker David Lesher, co-founder, editor and CEO, CALmatters. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

BILINGUAL POETRY READING Pomona College’s Mason Hall, 550 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont, is the site of a free bilingual poetry reading, “Intruder between Rivers,” from 4:15 to 6:15 p.m. Ricardo Pau-Llosa and Enrico Mario Santi have recently published a bilingual volume of poetry, Intruder between Rivers/lntruso entre rios, with Mr. Pau-Llosa’s English originals and Mr. Santi’s translations of “Cuban” poems—poems with Cuban or Cuban exile themes. The experimental reading will be in English and Spanish, or rather, “Cuban Spanish.” More info is at pomona.edu/events or (909) 621-8616.

COMBATTING CORRUPTION The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Combatting Corruption—An IMF Perspective,” with guest speaker Sean Hagan, a moderated discussion with CMC President Hiram Chodosh. Mr. Hagan is general counsel and director of the legal department at the International Monetary Fund, and advises the Fund’s management, executive board and membership on all legal aspects of the Fund’s operations, including its regulatory, advisory and lending functions. More information is at cmc.edu/ athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

HUMAN RIGHTS ROYALTY AT ULV Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. will give a free lecture at 6 p.m. at the University of La Verne’s Morgan Auditorium, 1950 Third St. Mr. Morris is co-founder and president of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives, which provides education to schools and other organizations about human trafficking. He is the great-great-great grandson of Frederick Douglass and the great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington. He has appeared on CNN, NPR the CBS Evening News, and has been a keynote speaker for the United Nations. Mr. Morris received the inaugural National Park Service Underground Railroad Network to Freedom’s Frederick Douglass Underground Railroad Legacy Award in 2012 for his commitment to promoting social change. His lecture is a signature event in the university’s Lyceum performing and visual arts series. Events are free and open to the public, but donations are encouraged. See the full calendar of events and subscribe at laverne.edu/lyceum.

Tuesday, February 27

THE COMPLICATED SOUTH The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “The Complicated South,” with guest speaker Garrard Conley. “The son of a Baptist preacher, memoirist and author of Boy Erased, Garrard Conley grew up gay in rural Arkansas. His experience attending an ‘ex-gay’ conversion therapy facility, followed by years of strained relationships with his family, led him to a unique and complicated understanding of the American South. Mr. Conley will share new insights he has developed into what it means to be Southern in the 21st century. Mr. Conley’s bestselling memoir, Boy Erased, traces the complex relationships between identity, faith and community. The book is currently being adapted as a film by Focus Features with Joel Edgerton directing. He was recently named a Lambda Award Finalist for memoir/autobiography. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

HIGH TECH TALK Claremont’s Harvey Mudd College’s Annenberg Leadership and Management Speaker Series presents a free lecture with Endre Holen from McKinsey and Company from 7 to 8 p.m. at Drinkward Recital Hall, 320 E. Foothill Blvd. Mr. Holen is the leader of the firm’s North American High Tech Practice. During his 20-plus years with McKinsey, he has served clients primarily in the high-tech and telecom industries on a wide range of topics. He has contributed to McKinsey’s internal knowledge-building efforts in enterprise IT, software, broadband communications and services, and semiconductors, and has co-authored several articles published in the McKinsey Quarterly. More info is at hmc.edu/Annenberg or (909) 607-1818.

Wednesday, February 28

PROMOTING EQUITY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “A Plan To Promote Equity Across Our Region,” with guest speaker Marianne Haver Hill. Ms. Hill, executive director of Propel LA, the countywide strategic plan for economic development housed at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, will discuss the implementation of this ambitious consensus-developed plan which involves more than 500 stakeholder groups and is designed to promote greater equity across the region, as well as more prosperity for all area residents through improved education and workforce development, job creation and livable communities. Previously, she served from 1987 - 2016 as the President and CEO of MEND—Meet Each Need with Dignity—the largest and most comprehensive poverty relief agency in the San Fernando Valley. More information is at cmc.edu/ athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

Thursday, March 1

REMBRANDT CLUB The Rembrandt Club’s free and open to the public First Thursday lecture and tea takes place from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building, Pomona College, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. The topic this month is “Improvisational Drawing and the Writing Machine,” by Mercedes Teixido, professor of art at Pomona College. A tea and reception will follow at Seaver House. More info is at (909) 374-1491.

NEW YORK ARTIST, NEW WORKS Pomona College Museum of Art, 330 N. College Ave., welcomes New York art activist Alexandra Bell for the West Coast premiere of three new pieces at 4:15 p.m. Ms. Bell is set to unveil “Charlottesville,” “A Teenager with Promise” and “Olympic Threat.” Her work investigates the language used by The New York Times to codify otherness, violence and justice in the United States. This event repeats tomorrow, March 2. More info is at pomona.edu/museum or (909) 621-8283.

HOW WE RISE The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “How We Rise: Strategies for Social Innovation,” with guest speaker Cheryl L. Dorsey, president and CEO of Echoing Green, who will demonstrate how through responsible leadership, businesses can promote a brighter future for all. Prior to leading this social impact organization, Ms. Dorsey was herself a social entrepreneur and received an Echoing Green Fellowship in 1992 to help launch The Family Van, a community-based mobile health unit in Boston. She has served in two presidential administrations as a White House Fellow and special assistant to the US Secretary of Labor (1997-98); special assistant to the director of the Women’s Bureau of the US Labor Department (1998-99); and vice-chair for the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships (2009-16). More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

MONSTERS TO DESTROY The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts yet another free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “Monsters to Destroy,” a multimedia performance by filmmaker and comedian Ben Tumin discussing refugee resettlement in the United States. Mr. Tumin worked for Amnesty International in Morocco and the social media platform Meetup before forging a career in political comedy and filmmaking. His work has been featured in The Daily Beast, Al Jazeera and on The Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC radio. “Mixing information about the refugee crisis with clips from interviews conducted with Scott Cooper, a retired marine working in human rights advocacy, and five young Syrians living in Germany, Mr. Tumin takes a different look at the impact of refugee resettlement, particularly from the perspective of national security,” a press release read. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

IMMIGRANT REALITIES IN LA A free and open to the public opening reception for “Finding Home: Immigrant Realities” takes place at 6 p.m. at Clark Humanities Museum, 1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont. The opening is part of the Scripps College Humanities Institute’s spring 2018 “Exclusive Nationalisms: Global Migration and Immigration” series, and features the work of three artists whose stories and beginnings span different parts of the world, yet are now based in the greater Los Angeles region. The exhibit includes the work of Brenda Gomez, youth photographer and artist from Pomona; graphic designer and multimedia artist Eunhae Yoo; and sculptor, ceramicist and installation artist, Saba Hakimi. For information, call (909) 621-8237, email humanitiesinstitute@scrippscollege.edu or visit the Clark Humanities Museum’s Facebook page.

Friday, March 2

CLASSICAL CONCERT Scripps College’s free Friday Noon concert series continues today with music by Melanie Bonis and Erwin Schulhoff. The show at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with performers Rachel V. Huang (Scripps), violin and Stephan Moss (Pomona/Scripps), piano. Sponsored by the departments of music at Pomona and Scripps Colleges. Doors open at noon, and food is not permitted in the auditorium. The weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps and the Pomona College Music Department. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

GROVE OF THORNS Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont, hosts Spiked Fridays in the Grove of Thorns from 5:30 to 8 p.m. “Spiked plants make fabulous spiked drinks—get even with the plants that cause you pain and enjoy wicked cocktails made with spiny botanicals,” a Garden press release read. “The menu will include four cocktails representing the four epic houses of the Game of Thorns: Rosa, Agave, Cactaceae and Legume.” The event is $15 and includes live music and one cocktail or beverage. Additional drinks will be available for purchase. More info is at rsabg.org or (909) 625-8767.

LEVERAGING TALENT  The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at CMC, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 5:30 p.m. lecture, “That Person in the Mirror: Leveraging Your Time, Talents and Assets to Make a Difference,” with guest speaker Judy Belk. In the keynote address for the first annual Women of Color Power and Purpose Forum, Ms. Belk, president and CEO of The California Wellness Foundation (Cal Wellness), will share reflections on how her personal journey has been shaped by deeply held values and how informed choices have helped advance her career, including as the current leader of one of California’s largest health philanthropies. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

A HAPPENING SCREENING, Q AND A Pitzer College hosts a free screening and Q and A with the director of the documentary film Happening: A Clean Energy Revolution at 6:30 p.m. in Benson Auditorium, 1050 N. Mills Ave., Claremont. Director James Redford will be on hand after the screening. Happening documents a colorful, personal journey into the dawn of the clean energy era as it creates jobs, turns profits and makes communities stronger and healthier. The event is sponsored by Pitzer’s Robert Redford Conservancy for Southern California Sustainability. For information, visit  pitzer.edu.

Saturday, March 3

TANGLED VINES AUTHOR Frances Dinkelspiel, author of Tangled Vines, gives a free and open talk at 1 p.m. at the Hughes Center’s Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. Learn how Ms. Dinkelspiel made it her mission to write this focused history of California winemaking. Books will be available for signing, and refreshments will be served. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Claremont Library. For information email friendsofclaremontlibrary@ gmail.com.

CHOIRS, ORCHESTRA IN FREE CONCERT The Joint Music Program’s 2018 Spring Concerts series brings The Claremont Concert Choir, Treble Singers and Orchestra, along with the Chaffey College Chamber Choir, for a free 8 p.m. concert at Garrison Theatre at  Scripps College, 241 E. 10th St., Claremont. On the program is Haydn, Te Deum; Poulenc, Litanies à la vierge noire; and Sibelius, Symphony No. 1. Charles W. Kamm (Scripps/Joint Music faculty) and Brian Stone (Joint Music faculty) will conduct. More info is at scrippscollege.edu/events or (909) 607-3267.