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Claremont Museum of Art Primal Nature; Scripps noon concert Sofia Gubaidulina

Friday, September 21

PRIMAL NATURE  Claremont Museum of Art, 200 W. First St., opens a new show at noon today, “Primal Nature: Animalia by Women in Post-War Claremont.” “Animals, both real and fantastic, occupied an important place in artistic expression in mid-twentieth-century Claremont, appearing in the work of ceramists, painters, enamelists, and sculptors,” a press release read. “Primal Nature, curated by Susan M. Anderson, focuses on this phenomenon, particularly in the work of women artists who played a vital role in the development of the arts in Claremont.” The exhibition, sponsored by Gould Asset Management LLC, will be on view through January 6, 2019. The museum is open Friday, Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., and during Art Walk, the first Saturday of every month, from 6 to 9 p.m. For information visit claremontmuseum.org.

FREE NOON CONCERT Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues with music by Sofia Gubaidulina (“Dancer on a Tightrope,” 1993) and Ravel (“Sonata,” 1927). The show at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with performers Sarah Thornblade, violin, and Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano. The weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps and the Pomona College Music Department. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE The city’s free live music series continues from 6 to 9 p.m. with musicians of all stripes performing throughout the Claremont Village. Tonight the Amanda Castro Band is at Laemmle plaza; Larry and Rhonda Jackson’s Small Town Magic perform at the chamber of commerce; Slinker is at Shelton Park; and Marc Weller’s jazz combo will be at city hall. More info is at claremontchamber.org.

COUNCIL CANDIDATES TALK HERITAGE, SUSTAINABILITY Sustainable Claremont and Claremont Heritage join to host the six Claremont City Council candidates in a free and open to the public forum from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Hahn Building, Room 101, at 420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. The hopefuls have been invited to dialogue with residents about heritage and future sustainability. Each candidate will give a brief presentation and answer questions from the audience. The event is in partnership with Pomona College and the League of Women Voters. For more information click over to sustainableclaremont.org or call (909) 625-8767, extension 238.

Saturday, September 22

WALK THE TOWN FOR REFORESTATION Sustainable Claremont’s Green Crew will “walk the town” to educate the public from 9 a.m. to noon and volunteers are welcome to take part. Interested folks should meet before 9 at Higginbotham Park, 600 Mt. Carmel Dr., Claremont. “Join Green Crew of Sustainable Claremont, a group of hands-on volunteers, as we begin the 2019 Reforestation with educational canvassing,” a press release read. “Speak with neighbors about the free street trees and ask for their commitment to water their trees.” For more information click over to sustainableclaremont.org or call (909) 625-8767, extension 238.

MIDTERM BALLOT PROS AND CONS The League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area hosts a free and open to the public November election pros and cons meeting at 10 a.m. in the Hughes Center’s Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. Participants will hear about the 11 propositions on the state ballot for the November 6 election and get an introduction to the League’s “Voting is your Voice” campaign. The Ruth Ordway Award for community service will also be presented. Light refreshments will be available beginning at 9:30. For more information visit lwvclaremontarea.org or call (909) 624-9457.

MARLEY’S GHOST SIGHTING Eclectic roots veterans Marley’s Ghost return to Claremont for a 7:30 p.m. concert at the Folk Music Center, 220 Yale Ave. Tickets are $15 and are available at the store or the door. Marley’s Ghost’s rare combination of chops, imagination and wit has led to collaborations with well-known musical icons such as the late Cowboy Jack Clement, as well as Marty Stuart, John Prine, Emmylou Harris and Van Dyke Parks. The band’s latest collaboration, with producer/musician Larry Campbell—whose previously worked with Bob Dylan and Levon Helm, among others—resulted in its eleventh album, The Woodstock Sessions, which was released in 2016. More info is at marleysghost.com or folkmusiccenter.com

Sunday, September 23

POETS READ AT CUCC Friends of the Claremont Library’s ongoing free and open to the public Fourth Sundays poetry series continues at 2 p.m. today with Amber West and Warren Liu. The readings are being held at Claremont United Church of Christ, at 233 W. Harrison Ave., while the library is undergoing a renovation. Ms. West is the author of two books of poetry: Daughter Eraser and Hen & God, as well as a variety of plays and “puppet poems” which have been performed nationally. Her poetry and scholarship have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Calyx, Puppetry International, The Feminist Wire, Furies: A Poetry Anthology of Women Warriors, and The Routledge Companion to Puppetry & Material Performance. She is director of the artist collective Alphabet Arts, for whom she created and directed the Puppets & Poets festival in New York City for many years. She teaches writing at UCLA and lives in North Hollywood with her husband, actor Sam T. West, and their son, Luke. Mr. Liu earned his master’s degree from the University of Iowa and a PhD from UC Berkeley. He is an associate professor of English at Scripps College, where he teaches courses in American literature and creative writing. Light refreshments will be served and books will be available for purchase. More info is at claremontlibrary.org.

Monday, September 24

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S INAUGURAL POET AT THE ATH The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free evening of poetry with Richard Blanco at 6:45 p.m. “Whether speaking as the Cuban Blanco or the American Richard, the homebody or the world traveler, the shy boy or the openly gay man, the civil engineer or the civic-minded poet, Richard Blanco’s writings possess a story-rich quality that illuminates the human spirit,” a press release read. Selected by President Barack Obama as the fifth inaugural poet in US history, Mr. Blanco is the youngest and the first Latino, immigrant and gay person to serve in such a role. His poem “One Today,” which he read at President Obama’s second inauguration in 2013, was later published as a children’s book. Born in Madrid to Cuban exile parents and raised in Miami, the negotiation of cultural identity characterizes his four collections of poetry: How to Love a Country; City of a Hundred Fires, which received the Agnes Starrett Poetry Prize from the University of Pittsburgh Press; Directions to The Beach of the Dead, recipient of the Beyond Margins Award from the PEN American Center; and Looking for The Gulf Motel, recipient of the Paterson Poetry Prize and the Thom Gunn Award. His latest book, Boundaries, a collaboration with photographer Jacob Hessler, challenges the physical and psychological dividing lines that shadow the United States. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Tuesday, September 25

REMEMBERING 9/11 The University Club of Claremont hosts an open to the public luncheon and discussion, “Remembering 9/11,” with guest speaker 9/11 survivor and author Michael Hingsdon. The event starts at 11:30 a.m. at Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. A $20 meeting fee includes a buffet lunch. Reservations are required via email at jrsilvache@verizon.com. “Join us for this special program, presented by a 9/11 survivor and rescuer,” a press release read. “Michael Hingson is a #1 New York Times best-selling author, technologist and motivational speaker. Blind since birth, Mr. Hingsdon survived the 9/11 terrorist attacks with the help of his guide dog, Roselle. This story of teamwork and his indomitable will to live and thrive is the subject of his book, Thunder Dog, and an upcoming motion picture. Michael and Roselle saved dozens of lives by guiding co-workers down 78 floors and out of Tower One just before it collapsed on 9/11. In Thunder Dog Michael leads us through his moment-by-moment account from inside the tower. Roselle died in July 2011 but won the American Humane Association Hero Dog Award posthumously in 2012 at a star-studded Beverly Hills gala which was televised by the Hallmark Channel.” More information is available at universityclubofclaremont.org.

MIXED RESULTS FROM LEGALIZED POT? The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 12:15 p.m. lecture, “Legalizing Marijuana: Lessons from Colorado,” with guest speaker Tony Mecia of The Weekly Standard, who will discuss how data shows that “legal weed has attracted vagrants and cartels from out-of-state, contributed to spikes in crime, and caused doctors to worry about the effect on public health.” Mr. Mecia spent more than a decade as a business reporter and editor at the Charlotte Observer in North Carolina. He is a graduate of Duke University and has a master’s in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@ cmc.edu.

CONSERVATIVE WRITER SEES DOOM The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts yet another free lecture, this one at 6:45 p.m., “The Future and Past of Conservatism,” with guest speaker Jonah Goldberg. “As contradictory as it may sound, Jonah Goldberg of the American Enterprise Institute believes that the conservative movement is constantly changing,” a press release read. “Maintaining that the Bush years changed conservatism in profound ways, mostly for the worse, he will examine how Trump’s presidency will further these changes. What does the future of conservatism look like? And does conservatism’s failure necessarily mean liberalism’s success?” Jonah Goldberg is a fellow and Asness Chair in Applied Liberty at the American Enterprise Institute, where he writes about political and cultural issues. He is concurrently a senior editor at National Review. A bestselling author, he writes a nationally syndicated column that appears regularly in more than 100 newspapers across the United States. He is also a weekly columnist for the Los Angeles Times, a member of the board of contributors to USA Today, a Fox News contributor, and a regular member of the Fox News All-Stars panel on Special Report with Bret Baier. He is the author of two New York Times bestsellers, The Tyranny of Clichés and Liberal Fascism. The founding editor of National Review Online, Mr. Goldberg was named by The Atlantic magazine as one of the top 50 political commentators in America. More information is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

BOMBA ENSEMBLE IN FREE SHOW Powerhouse New York City-based Afro-Puerto Rican Bomba Ensemble Redobles de Cultura will perform a free and open to the public 7 p.m. concert at Pomona College’s Edmunds Ballroom, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. The concert will include a drumming demonstration and dance lessons. Bomba is a traditional music style from Puerto Rico, played with two or more drums, and is a mixture of African, Spanish and Taino cultures. Bomba is also a dancing style, where instead of dancing to the drumming beat, it is the drummer who follows the dancer. Redobles de Cultura is a collective that has toured internationally to Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Germany, Thailand, Singapore, Africa, the Dominican Republic and other countries. For more information call (909) 621-8804 or email grace_davilalopez@pomona.edu.

LOCAL UN EXPLORES IMMIGRATION The Pomona Valley United Nations Association hosts a free and open to the public 7 p.m. lecture, “Immigration Policy and the United Nations,” at Hahn Hall, 420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. The panel discussion is the first in the group’s fall series on global issues and the UN. The series is co-sponsored by the PVUNA and the international programs of Pomona College. Light refreshments will be served. For more information click on pv.una-socal.org or call (909) 625-9670.

Wednesday, September 26

CONCERT OF MEDICINE, FOOD FOR LIVING, DEAD Pomona College hosts Musekiwa Chingodza, a Zimbabwean mbira player, in a free and open to the public 4:15 p.m. concert and talk at Lyman Hall, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the show. “Our music is both medicine and food, as mbira has the power to heal and to provide for people,” said Mr. Chingodza in a press release. “Mbira pleases both the living and the dead.” Born into a family of great mbira players in the village Mwangara, of Murewa, Zimbabwe, Mr. Chingodza began playing at the age of five. He has recorded solo and collaborative albums and since 1999 and has been a regular visitor to the US, sponsored by the Kutsinhira Cultural Arts Center in Eugene, Oregon. At Pomona College he will play traditional Zimbabwean sacred and celebratory songs on the mbira nhare (aka mbira dzavadzimu) as well as the nyunganyunga, and sing in the Shona language. More info is at pomona.edu/events.

‘FRANKENSTEIN’ AS PRESAGE TO MODERN ANXIETIES The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at CMC, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 6:45 p.m. lecture, “Frankenstein and the Anxieties of Modernity,” with guest speaker Jerrold E. Hogle. Mr. Hogle is an expert in English romantic literature, literary and cultural theory, and the many different forms of the gothic. His talk will show how many deep-seated cultural quandaries about the coming of the modern world—anxieties very much still with us—are symbolized in Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel, particularly in the Creature, who has become its most lasting image. Mr. Hogle’s books include, among others, Shelley’s Process, The Undergrounds of The Phantom of the Opera and The Cambridge Companion to Gothic Fiction, which was recently succeeded by a follow-up volume, The Cambridge Companion to the Modern Gothic. More info is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/ open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Thursday, September 27

EXPERIMENTAL MUSICIAN IN FREE WORKSHOP Pomona College’s busy Lyman Hall hosts London-based pianist, experimental musician and free improviser Tania Chen for a free and open to the public 4:15 p.m. workshop. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the show at 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. Ms. Chen, a sound artist who works with pianos, keyboards, found objects and more, will present this informative interactive workshop where participants will discuss the components of performance and their relationship to their instruments and sound making objects. The event is “open to all who want to explore spontaneity and improvisation as an artistic practice.” Participants are invited to bring instruments and/or sound making objects such as small radios, stones, etc. More info is at library.claremont.edu.

LIVE FROM THE DUMPSTER FIRE The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at CMC, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free 6:45 p.m. lecture, “Live From the Dumpster Fire: The Challenges of Journalism in the Trump Era,” with guest speaker Tina Nguyen. “In an era of dwindling resources and increasing hostility towards the press, how does one cover a president and administration obsessed with alternative facts and dramatic twists, a populist base that will follow no matter what, and an internet easily manipulated by foreign influences and fake news memes?” a press release asked. Ms. Nguyen is a staff reporter at The Hive, covering the power players of Silicon Valley, Washington and Wall Street. She covers American politics, the conservative movement and the media. Prior to Vanity Fair, she worked at Mediaite, The Daily Caller and The Braiser, where she was nominated for a James Beard Award. Ms. Nguyen graduated from Claremont McKenna College in 2011, where she was news editor for the Claremont Independent, a fellow at the Salvatori Center, and an occasional cartoonist/columnist for The Forum. More info is at cmc.edu/athenaeum/ open-events, (909) 621-8244 or via email at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Friday, September 28

CENTENNIAL PERFORMANCE OF ‘THE SOLDIER’S TALE’ Scripps College’s free Friday Noon Concert Series continues with music by Pomona College faculty and friends, who will perform the suite from Stravinsky’s “The Soldier’s Tale,” 100 years (to the date) after its premiere. The show at Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont, kicks off at 12:15 p.m. with performers Alfred Cramer, violin; Connie Deeter, bass; Kay Nevin, clarinet; Carolyn Beck, bassoon; Ray Burkhart, cornet; Andrew Glendening, trombone; and Theresa Dimond, percussion with Eric Lindholm, conductor. The weekly concerts are a joint production of Scripps and the Pomona College Music Department. More info is at collegescalendar.org or (909) 607-3266.

HARMONY SISTERS AT LAEMMLE Friday Nights Live, the city’s free music series, continues from 6 to 9 p.m. with musicians of all stripes performing throughout the Claremont Village. Tonight the Harmony Sisters bring 1940s big band nostalgia to Laemmle plaza; Los Whateveros are at the chamber of commerce; Big Wednesday Band is at Shelton Park; and Daniel Harmon plays at city hall. More info is at claremontchamber.org.

Saturday, September 29

BECOME A MASTER TREE STEWARD Sustainable Claremont hosts a free and open to the public Green Crew Tree Steward Workshop from 9 a.m. to noon at Claremont Heritage, 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd. “Become a master tree steward at Sustainable Claremont’s new and improved workshop,” a press release read. Among the topics are Claremont Heritage and a tour of Memorial Park heritage trees; a class on the benefits of trees and the importance of urban forestry and successful community engagement; and hands-on info about planting and watering best practices. Attendees are required to attend two workshops, lead volunteers in two planting events, and participate in two “walk the town” educational canvassing events. For more details or to RSVP, email           greencrew@sustainableclaremont.org or call (909) 625-8767, extension 238.

GOT ART? THE PILGRIMS WILL TAKE IT Pilgrim Place’s fifth annual art donation party, Got Art?, takes place from 10 a.m. to noon at the Fine Arts Studio, 698 Scrooby Lane, Claremont. Donors are asked to bring framed or unframed wall art to donate to help support the 2018 Pilgrim Place Festival’s fine arts booth. Refreshments will be served. More information is available by calling (909) 399-5500.

TWO EXHIBITS OPEN AT PITZER Pitzer College Art Galleries opens two fall exhibitions: Elana Mann: Instruments of Accountability; and Cassie Riger: Automatic Vaudeville, from 2 to 4 p.m. at Nichols Gallery, 1050 N. Mills Ave., Claremont. The events are free and open to the public. The opening reception for Elana Mann: Instruments of Accountability and Cassie Riger: Automatic Vaudeville will feature performances by Sharon Chohi Kim and Micaela Tobin, Allison Johnson and Dana Reason. More information is at pitzer.edu/event.